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Blanket Pattern for MultiColor yarns


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Most patterns originally done with a solid color can be done with a variegated (multi-color) yarn.  I'm not sure what yarn is available in Singapore.  I can only talk about US yarn.  I'm most familiar with acrylic, worsted weight variegated yarn, sold in big box stores (Walmart, Craft Stores, etc.)  It's great for blankets.  I typically pair a variegated yarn with 1 or 2 matching solid colors, but it's not necessary.

When choosing a variegated yarn for a pattern, the most important thing to look at is how fast the colors change.  For example, Red Heart's Soft changes colors very fast, every couple of inches.  The new Sweet Rolls changes colors very slowly, almost a third of the roll before the color changes.  Then there is everything in between those two extremes. Lion Brand's colors change at a nice, colorful rate.  When colors change too fast, the result can look muddy.  This is because the colors change almost every stitch.  When the colors change too slow, the result can look like stripes.  This is because you can complete entire rows before the color changes.  If you want a colorful blanket, I'd look for something that changes colors every 6-12 inches.  It doesn't have to be exactly in that range.  At the store, pull out the end of the yarn to the length of your forearm and see how many times it changes colors.  Zero color changes in that length means your colors will change slowly.  1-2 color changes in that length means your colors will change every few stitches (colorful).  3 or more color changes in that length means your colors will change almost every stitch (do a swatch of the pattern to see if you like it or not.)

The next most important thing to look for is a simple pattern.  Complex stitches don't show up with most variegated yarn, so there's no sense in doing them.  A pattern with a simple repeat, like a ripple (round or rectangle), shells, all DC, granny squares, etc. work best.  The simpler the pattern, the better it works with variegated yarn, in my opinion.  Personally, I love mile-a-minute patterns with a mix of variegated and solid rounds the best.

ETA: I forgot to talk about yarn pooling.  You can actually plan where your colors will fall to achieve regular pooling of colors.  I've never done it, but it looks very cool.  Google "yarn pooling."  There are several articles about what it is and how to do it.

Edited by redrosesdz
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What is on my to-do list for 'one of these days' is to try a pattern designed for planned pooling - now that is cool.  If you can't get RHSS in Singapore, you can google sites that explain how to do this with other yarns by doing some swatching and measuring.

edit, I didn't realize there were videos on my link...

Edited by Granny Square
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If you get a yarn with long color changes, patterns that would look good would be a simple ripple pattern, a giant granny square, or anything with granny-type motifs (squares/hexagons/circles made from the center out then joined).  

James C brett Marble is a really pretty yarn, heres an example of a blanket made with it http://www.ravelry.com/projects/watcherlks/brilliant-colors-baby-throw-2

Jojoland Rhythm comes in gorgeous colors, blanket example http://www.ravelry.com/projects/skeincharmer/big-nest-for-little-one

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