darski

My Crochet Toolbox

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In a discussion in another thread I was saying that I believe that FDC (foundation dc) is one of those techniques that we all should know just because it makes our crochet time more enjoyable.  These bits of knowledge function as tools when we take on a project.   More options/tools means more ideas and so on and so on.

 

In this discussion I would like to know what techniques (beyond basic ch,sc, dc, hdc) you think are baseline gotta know things to do.  This isn't about the crochet hardware - just techniques, stitches and other bits of crochet lore we all call on when we pick up a hook.

 

I started with one but I'll leave it to you to come up with more (I have a dozen but I want to see your views first :)  I will try to edit in your suggestions so we will have a list at the end.

 

The List:

 

. Foundation DC

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Great topic, Darski!  Like you, I have a dozen or so, but I'm going to add just one.

 

I think knowing the multiple ways to make a ring for anything round is important.  A static ring, chains that joined with a slip stitch, is great when you want a hole and have a lot of stitches in the first round.  An adjustable ring, Magic Circle or 2 chains, are great when you don't want a hole or want to be able to adjust the size of the hole.  Personally, my favorite is making 2 chains for an adjustable ring.  I've tried a few methods for a Magic Circle and haven't found as quick for me.  (I've noticed that how to start something round has come up a lot in the newbie questions lately.)

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Very interesting topic!

 

I agree that foundation sts and starting rings are very important!  

 

After those, the first thing that comes to my mind is weaving in ends.  Like most things, there are a multitude of approaches to this task.  I think it's important to know a few of them so one can choose the best way for the particular project.  

 

And that makes me think of the related techniques, like how to add in new yarn as you go along.   Also how to join motifs and how to seam pieces together.  For each of these there are so many different ways to do each one, and I certainly don't know them all, but I have learned a few that seem to work for me over the course of making different projects.  There are some cool off-the-beaten path techniques like the "Asian  seam" documented by Jenny King, that is great to use for joining garment pieces that have a lot of openwork.  

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Oh, you guys took the good ones!  

 

A lot of people complain about the gappy row starts for DC when using the conventional 'turn, ch-3, skip first stitch, DC in next stitch'.  So, I think a handy item for the toolbox would be knowing a couple of ways to 'fix' the gap.  There is a great alternative called the chainless starting DC.  For me, unfortunately, they turn out a bit looser looking than I'd like, so I typically turn, (NO chain), SC in the first stitch, chain 1 (or 2 perhaps for those who make taller stitches).  Or, turn, slip stitch in the first stitch, chain 2 or 3 works, too.

 

Speaking of DCs, standing DCs (or other standing stitches too) are handy, and not just for in the round.

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Darski ~ Thanks for starting this thread!  I'm already learning new things...and being reminded of things I've forgotten. :)

 

Knowing how to calculate pattern multiples is another great tool.  Quite often I just chain away and undo the extras, but it's nice to have a more accurate number of chains, too. 

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I'm going to jump in with another one.  Learning how to join as you go for motifs, panels and blocks is a huge time-saver!

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Great thread.  Eons ago when I started crocheting I NEVER (as in absolutely NEVER) swatched anything...lol.  However in the last 15 or 20 years I have discovered just how helpful swatching can be.  You can figure out the sizes of your individual crochet stitches, changes for tension and length, which translates into sizing for wearables.  I have learned how different thickness and textures of yarn work up with different patterns and hooks.  And, I am just beginning to play around with color pooling (another thing I NEVER thought of doing...lol) and a swatch helps me see the actual coloring lines.  So, I'll add swatching to this wonderful crochet toolbox.  Barbara

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I'm going to add another one, to keep this wonderful thread going!

 

I never end with a slip stitch as the last stitch.  Instead of a slip stitch, I weave the final tail through to mimic a slip stitch.  It saves from having a knot at the end.  Also, it looks like the top of a stitch, so you can't tell where I ended the project.

 

This link does it a bit differently than I do, but it's the same concept ...

http://mrsmicawber.blogspot.com/2012/06/pardon-me-but-your-slip-stitch-is.html

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Love all the tips, everyone!  Crochet addiction is a good thing. :D

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New people often don't know how much to chain up when beginning each row. In general, ch up 1 for a sc row, 2 for a hdc row and 3 for a dc row. For a dc row, if the ch 3 is looking loose or sloppy, tighten up the 3, or only do 2 in the future.

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