Linda

Vintage Pineapple doily

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This doily comes from Bucilla Crochet Book No. 1 published in 1914.  Made with #20 LizBeth thread  using #10 hook and measures 18 inches.

 

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How do you prevent puckering

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Puckering happens when you have too many stitches, tension is too tight, or the hook is too small for the thread/yarn thickness with that pattern.  Or a combination of those things.  It can also occur if you leave mistakes in the project, instead of ripping back and correcting them.

Where are you in the project...near the beginning? middle? end?  Does the pattern have a gauge?  Did you match the gauge?  You may be using the wrong size hook for your tension or the thread you're using is slightly thicker than the designer's thread.  Does your stitch count match the pattern exactly?  Do you have any mistakes that you didn't correct? 

If you're not too far along, try starting over with a larger hook.  If you're finished, try blocking it.

Edited by redrosesdz

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^what she said, but there's 2 kinds of puckering.  When you make something in the round, your personal stitch height gauge makes a difference if it is different from the designer's.  The ratio of diameter to circumference has to be right for it to lie flat.

You might mean cupping - so the middle is flat, but there's not enough fabric at the edges so the ends curl up.  You can't fix cupping with blocking, you need to rip back past where it starts, and re-do with remedies.  Sometimes cupping happens, and you get beyond it and it stops cupping but you end up with a 'bubble'.

Or, you might mean ruffling - so if you try to get it to lay flat, there's extra fabric at the edge that frills up.  If it isn't too severe, you can block it out if you are aggressive enough.

Cupping cure:  cupping means the circumference is too small for the diameter.  The fix is to add stitches (increases circumf.), or substitute shorter stitches (decrease diameter). 

Ruffling cure: ruffling happens when the circumference is too big for the diameter.  If aggressive blocking doesn't fix it, the cure is to subtract stitches (decreases circumf), or make taller stitches or add a round or rounds without increasing (increases diameter).  

You may just have to adjust 1 round for everything to lie flat, or several, depending on your height gauge and the pattern. 

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