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Babette Texan

new to forum and to crocheting, hate reading patterns

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Hi everyone, I am new to all of this but I need some advice, I picked up some varigated yarn today a 4 and using a 6.5 hook, I want to make a lapghan and I want to know what is the easiest and best stich for it.  Thank you in advance

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Welcome to the ville!

Have you already been practicing your stitches? If not you may want to do so before you start a relatively large project.

 

With a 6.5 hook your stitches may be fairly loose, and if so, single crochet would make a nice ghan. Otherwise i would go with half doubles or doubles.

 

If you want to combine different stitches, there are lots of ways you could go.

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I agree that single crochet is probably best.

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Welcome to Crochetville!

 

Is this your first variegated yarn?  I always recommend starting with a medium, solid color to see the stitches better.  It sounds like you are past that.  If you've been practicing sc, hdc, and dc, then go with the one you're most comfortable with.  If you don't want to read a pattern, then the next best thing is using the same stitch for the entire lapghan.

 

Here's a table of afghan sizes that might help you...

http://thecrochetcrowd.com/afghan-sizes/

 

And a calculator for the size that you pick ...

http://thecrochetcrowd.com/afghan-calculator/

 

Have fun and please post a pic when you're done!  We'd love to see it.  :)

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I know you hate reading patterns, it's like learning to read another language at first until you get the hang of it.  But I do suggest you try; you will get the hang of it sooner than you think.  Videos are nice to learn a completely new stitch combination, or technique, but not so much for a whole pattern.   For one thing, although there some are good videos, there seem to be a whole lot of really awful ones; for another, there aren't videos for every design you might want to make.

 

Here is a guide to reading patterns; other good stuff if you click on the menu on the right side (US terminology)

http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/tip_crochet.html

Another very helpful site for beginners, I'm linking to the menu page

http://www.crochetcabana.com/html/tutorials.html

 

Just in general, some patterns are available in chart/diagram form; there are symbols that represent the stitches and are good for those that don't like written patterns since the diagram sort of looks like the finished stitch pattern.  They are international (no words), so you could use a pattern designed by a non English speaker.  The first link above has a menu item that shows you the stitch symbols.

 

A plain SC blanket will take the most yarn, and is very easy.  A plain DC blanket would also be easy, take a bit less yarn, and would 'go' quicker; also would be less dense than a SC blanket.  Both would also be rather boring, but good TV-watching activity.

 

If you didn't have variegated yarn, I was going to suggest maybe trying a simple, more interesting stitch--for example I remember learning the shell stitch very early, and loved the look of it and it was very easy.  However, I also would not have recommended variegated for a beginner (hard to see what you're doing), and would not recommend variegated for anybody unless they were using a very plain stitch (it obliterates pretty stitch patterns).

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I have made a couple of scarfs with dc, and I just wanted to make sure you could make an afghan with just that kind of stitch as I researched and found that some stitches are not good using varigated yarn.  Do I need to make some kind of boarder?

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We must have been typing and the same time!  

 

Really, I can't think of a REASON for a border (ever), except appearance-wise (lacy border to dress up a plain blanket for example) or if some fancy lace blanket had loopy edges and would be sturdier a border for example.

 

You could certainly get away without it.  The only advantage might be that the 'stitch tops' would then show all the way around the blanket.

 

If you make a border with SC...everybody has different stitch tension width and height-wise; for the sides, you may be able to just make a border stitch in the side of each SC, or you might have to skip a stitch (or make 2 into 1) occasionally to keep the sides from pulling tight or rippling, depending on your tension.  Same thing for DC; the easiest way to make a DC border is to make 2 stitches around the 'post' of the DC on the sides, but it doesn't look as nice (is gappy); I like to make a stitch between the rows of DC, and another into the threads of the DC post to mitigate the gap.  More or fewer stitches might also apply depending on your tension.

 

For the corners, the 'rule' is 3 stitches for SC, 5 for DC.  I like to make the middle stitch a chain, because it decreases the bulk and turns a sharper corner.

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Every variegated yarn is different so It can be real hard to predict which will look good in a particular stitch pattern.  Also people's tastes differ on how they want the variegation to turn out.  

 

You dont have to use the same stitch throughout the piece.  For instance, you could alternate a row of sc then a row of dc.  

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Kathy makes a great point about the variegated yarn.  If it's a lot of colors and it changes colors quickly (1-3" for each color), then it'll look "muddy" if the stitch is more than just sc, dc or a combination.  If there are 2-4 colors and they're spaced farther apart, then you can do more with it.

 

I really like to find solids that match the variegated.  Putting in a few rows of solids between rows of variegated gives the eye a break.  This is especially true for the short color change variegated yarn.

 

Your best bet is to just pick something and start.  If you decide you don't like it, you can always rip it out and start over with something different.  I usually don't know if I like something, until several rows are done.

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True (taste in variegated), you can tell I'm not a fan, have had a few  "ewww, clown barf" results so mostly avoid it.  There are also all sorts of variegated yarn, with very short to very long color runs, that can be good or bad depending on what you're going for, and depending on the pattern and your tension.  

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