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Cut the base chain - help save my King size blanket that is half done!


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Hi everyone!

 

I'm a new crochet addict from Colorado. I have only made some blankets so far, but really enjoying it! Can't wait to see everything all you talented people have going on.

 

So I may have completely messed up the KING size blanket I decided to crochet as a newbie (probably not the smartest). When I first started working on it I made the first single crochet line way too tight. It was making the whole blanket wavy, so now that I have about half of the thing done, I decided to cut the first chain and try to unravel a couple rows and re-crochet. Is this possible? I am having a hard time wrapping my head around how to fix it. The blanket is made of double crochets. I used this tutorial -

 

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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Welcome to Crochetville!

 

What you're talking about is called the "foundation chain."  Making a bunch of chains is a common way to start a flat project, like a blanket.  When you're new, it's very easy to make the foundation chain too tight.  It needs to be loose, because the first row pulls at one or two of the yarn strands in each chain. 

 

One of the things that you can do is crochet your foundation chain using a larger hook than the rest of the project.  Go up at least one hook size (more if it's still too tight.)

 

Another thing is to make sure that you're using the diameter of the hook to make each chain.  There's a skinny part under the hook, called the "throat."  Make sure that your stitches are past the throat.  Using the skinny part will make them too tight.

 

The other way to start a flat project is using foundation stitches, instead of a foundation chain.  There are tutorials out there for foundation single crochet (fsc), foundation double crochet (fdc), etc.  It's a bit tricky when you're learning, but handy to know and easier once you've practiced.  My favorite tutorial costs, but there are free ones out there, too.  It's called "Mastering Foundation Crochet Stitches" by Marty Miller at craftsy.com.

 

So, the good news is that there are a couple of tricks to make the foundation chain loose when you start a project.  The bad news is that if it is too tight, you either have to start over or live with one edge being tight.  Either way, we'd love to see a pic when you're done!  Good luck!

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Thank you for the tips on making the foundation chain looser, I have made projects since this blanket and it worked much better using a hook a couple sizes larger!

 

So are you saying that since I have cut that foundation chain, I should unravel everything and start over? That's my only hope?

 

Should have asked before I cut I guess.

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Magiccrochetfan, yes I did see your repair tutorial, but I think they require you to crochet a new chain on the side before cutting the excess rows. That is excellent advice for next time, but I am in a pickle because I already cut a couple rows and am trying to backtrack now.

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That tutorial is for making changes, repairs, or additions. It's not for fixing the foundation chain.

 

At this point, I'd stop cutting. Depending on the type of yarn, you may be able to unravel and use it to start over. If you're using Bernat's blanket yarn, it's reusable after unraveling.

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Redrosesdz, well that is the best news I've heard all day! I AM using Bernats so at least the cost isn't lost. Just a lot of man hours. I guess it's a good lesson for a new crocheter. I will know next time if it is waving a few rows in, instead of doing 75 more rows hoping it will flatten out, I'll just start over!

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Yea! Just make sure that your foundation chain is as loose as possible.

 

I just remembered another tip. Try pinching the last chain as you crochet the next chain. It adds a little extra space, making the chain looser.

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I thought the tutorial was more self-evident about how to use the techniques to do this task, but i see now it is not.

 

That tutorial is for making changes, repairs, or additions. It's not for fixing the foundation chain.

If you look here https://sites.google.com/site/crochetalterations/removing-dc-rows  it shows how to remove a row by going into the row above and stabilizing the bottom of it by adding the equivalent of the initial chain.  then you can remove the rows below that.  

 

Magiccrochetfan, yes I did see your repair tutorial, but I think they require you to crochet a new chain on the side before cutting the excess rows. That is excellent advice for next time, but I am in a pickle because I already cut a couple rows and am trying to backtrack now.

You'd need to sacrifice a row, but you could stabilize the row above your current bottom row.  then remove the bottom row.  Note that I personally have not done this on a project.   At this point, if you wanted to try it, you have little to lose.

But there is absolutely nothing wrong with ripping back and we pretty much all have to do it at times.  The lesson of the need to keep your beginning chain loose is indeed a valuable one :hook

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Yes, the tutorial works for between sc rows. However, the op's issue is the foundation chain. She just called it an sc row by mistake. That's why I said it wouldn't help for her issue. I watched the video and saw that the pattern only has a foundation chain and dc rows.

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the part that I believe would work for this is titled Removing DC Rows.  as I said, it involves stabilizing the bottom of a row and then removing the rows below it.  So in this case you could go up one row from where the chain was cut, stabilize that row, then remove the row below it (the row closest to the initial chain).  

 

Again, this is just one approach to fixing the problem.  It might not be easier than starting over, it might be frustrating and you'd end up starting over anyway.  Nothing at all wrong with ripping and redoing, we've probably all learned a lot by doing that, i know I have.  

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