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How does the reader of a crochet CHART determine if a stitch is to be worked IN a chain space below (by inserting hook into the 'v') or if the hook is to simply work UNDER that chain space (NOT inserting hook into the 'v' but putting the hook under and behind the chain space to hook the yarn)?

 

I appreciate anyone who directs me to understanding!

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Hi, welcome to the ville!

 

Almost always, y ou work into the space. Only rarely do you need to anchor the stitch by working into a chain.

 

What is the name and location of the sppecific pattern?

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For a chain SPACE, I agree that it's assumed stitches are to be worked around the chain (into the space, not the chain) from what I've seen.  Also, a lot of times (non filet) the chain is x stitches, but you are putting y stitches around the chain, so...

 

The only time I personally vary from that is in filet, where I think working into the chain stitches looks neater and keeps my stitches the same height.  

 

Good question on the charting of an exception, though...

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The chain stitch into which a stitch is to be made can be marked in bold face.

Or a small caret (^) can appear under the chain stitch.

Sometimes, the pattern grapher simply has text explaining that stitches are made into rather than around the chain.

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I recently made a scarf http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/milky-way-5 that is basically filet.  In the written part, the first row where you are working into chains, it says to work into the stitch not the space.  In the diagram there is nothing that shows this, you have to read the written.  

 

it seems to me I've seen patterns where there was a tiny arrow pointing to the chain stitch, but I'm not sure what that was or if I am just imagining it  :lol     if i can find an example i will come back and post

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The chain stitch into which a stitch is to be made can be marked in bold face.

Or a small caret (^) can appear under the chain stitch.

Sometimes, the pattern grapher simply has text explaining that stitches are made into rather than around the chain.

 

hi Joan, I didn't see your post while I was typing.  A caret is probably what I was vaguely remembering!  

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Jsilvers ... magiccrochetfan ... granny square

 

Jsilvers - great...thank you!

 

Magiccrochetfan - thank you for asking, but it is for no specific pattern that i ask. I wanted to know for general information as i am learning to read charts. I have come across many patterns with no written instructions.

 

Granny square - thank you for the extra insight :)

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Welcome to Crochetville!

 

I agree with the other posters.  When there are no written instructions, then the safest thing is to assume what is normally done.  Normally, the crochet is done in the chain space, rather than into the chain stitches.  I would think that if the designer intended something other than the norm, they'd point it out.

 

That being said, the original intention of where to crochet is not as important as what you like.  If you're ever unsure of what is meant, try it a couple of different ways.  One of the ways is bound to be the one that looks right to you.  I can't tell you how many times I've made slight variations to instructions to make it look the way I want.  When you are done NO ONE ELSE is ever going to know you made a change to the original, unless you tell them.  The crochet design police don't come to your house and tell you it's wrong.  ;)

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I've seen a carat a few times, but it meant "start here" as I recall. Also text won'help if you are following a pattern in another language / alphabet.

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