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Hi all,

Well I am back again with another question..... I finished my last scarf project (which didn't turn out too great and need to get new yarn now... :bang ) but I am now about to start the awareness ribbon shawl for my mom again and well I stumbled on something in a book.... The pattern I am using is using the Red Heart Super Saver yarn, which I don't really like because it's a bit coarse and synthetic feeling to me. Anyways, I bought a different yarn, same weight, both were worsted, the only difference was the brand and color.. 

 

Well I was reading a crochet book this morning (that I got years ago) and just stumbled onto a part that said, "You'll need to use a yarn similar to the one the pattern calls for" and then it says later on "A loosely spun yarn will look different from a yarn with a tighter twist".

 

It hit me like a ton of bricks :thair ... Does this mean that all the yarn I just bought and wound into a ball is too loosely wound that I can't use it for this project? I know Red Heart's Super Saver yarn is spun pretty tightly so I was wondering if I can't use it now or if I should just go for it (using the help and improv ideas that was given to me from you all on here before) and try making the shawl anyways?

 

Any and all help is greatly appreciated! 

Here's the link to the pattern I am using again in case it'll be able to help at all! : http://naztazia.com/

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That book gave you incomplete advice! If you want something to look exactly like something someone else made, then use the same yarn.  Argghhhh!  Make it your own by using what you want!  I do try for the same yarn thickness (weight), but other than that I often switch the yarn to what I want for a project.  I've used roving (yarn that isn't plied) when the original designer used a tightly plied yarn and loved what I made.  I've used thinner and thicker than what the original used and just adjusted my hook size.  In other words, use the new yarn that you bought.  Make it your own.  You don't have to copy the yarn to follow a pattern.

 

As soon as someone tells me that I can't do this or that, then it's the first thing I want to try!  LOL  Not everything works out, but I absolutely hate the words "can't" and "have/need to ..." when it comes to make crafts.  The only way you'll know what YOU like is to try it.

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I also check gauge. Even when I use same brand yarn I sometimes have to play with hook size to match. When I'm using different brands weight can vary so again I check gauge and adjust to get look I want.

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I doubt it's talking about how tightly your balls are wound but the actual twist and spin of the yarn itself.

 

Caron Pounder is a good substitute.  It's soft, similar in size and holds up well.

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^ What RoseRed said, the book was referring to the way the yarn was spun from raw materials, and then plied together, not how the finished yarn was rewound into a ball.  However I will say, if you rewind skeins into balls, you want to do it loosely - when I was new and didn't know better, I wound  balls rather tightly, which ruined the yarn - it took all of the springiness out of the yarn.  You want to wind them so they're 'squishy'.

 

There is nothing wrong with using a loosely wound yarn for a shawl, in fact it would be nice and soft, better drape for a clothing item.  Stiffer yarns like RHSS and the pounders are great for blankets and stuffed toys, and I use RHSS to knit sweaters with, but would't be my first choice for crocheting most clothing items (except hats maybe).

 

Sometimes more loosely wound/plied yarns can be 'splittier', which is not 100% bad, just something to watch for as you're working your stitches.

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Also, RHSS softens up once it's washed. How yarn feels is strongly individual. Caron Simply Soft is just what it says, but it's slightly thinner and will work to a smaller gauge for most people. Pounder will work up about the same size. You may find you like working with actual wool or other animal fiber; if so, go to a yarn shop or fair-sized bog box store like Michael's and pet different brands to see what appeals to you.

 

If you have yarn that's messed up by being overwound, and it's acrylic that can be machine-washed and dried like Super Saver, just unwind it onto a fairly large book or piece of cardboard, slide it off the book, rubber band it tightly in a few places and throw it in the laundry. It'll ger most of the spring back.

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Most yarn that you can buy at the big craft stores (AC Moore, Michaels, JoAnn's, Walmart, Hobby Lobby, etc.) are designed to be center pulled.  You don't have to wind them into a ball.  In fact it's easier if you don't rewind it.  Also, don't take the label off until the yarn is almost all used.

 

Here's how...

1. Look for the end that starts the outside of the skein.  Tuck it under the label to get it out of the way.

2. Stick 1 or 2 fingers in the middle and pull.  You'll get a small wad, called yarn barf.

3. Find the end in the yarn barf and start crocheting from that end.  Once you get through the yarn barf, it will pull out easily and the skein stays nice, until the very end.  Note: you might have it catch a few times until the middle is loose enough.

 

In addition to using the center pull, I put my yarn in a mesh laundry bag (3 for a $ at the dollar store) or you can put it in a yarn holder.  I then weave the end from the center through one of the holes in the mesh.  The yarn stays nice and clean from pet hair, etc., and it pulls really easily.  After I get through the yarn barf, I rarely have to feed it before crocheting.  I'm currently working on a project that uses 7 colors and the LB bon bons.  I've got each color and the pack of bon bons in their own bags.  It makes it so easy!

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Lol Thanks everyone!

 

@redrosedz: I will totally do that next time! I wrapped my own by loosely wrapping it around my hand. I've made the mistake a few times when I tried crocheting years ago and my yarn was too tight.

 

The book was referring to how the yarn itself was wound, not how I rewound it. So my big concern with starting the project again was that the yarn I got was originally loose and wanted to double check before I put too much time into it again. 

 

Thank you all for your help again! I am still pretty new to this so every little bit helps! Lol I actually have a sore hand from crocheting so much and so fast when I was making a scarf (which didn't turn out too well :/ ) but I am anxious to start a new project and now know what I did wrong last time and with the scarf! 

 

To quote Walt Disney- Keep Moving Forward!

 

Thanks again!! :manyheart  :ty 

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Whenever I use a yarn new to me, I always make a 4-6" swatch out of the pattern stitches to determine if I'm going to like it or not. I too always use the center pull if possible. Saves a lot of grief. Now, if we could just get all the yarn companies to make the center pull strand easier to find to eliminate Yarn Barf!

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Has anyone looked at the link?  It's a beautiful scarf!

 

Caron simply soft doesn't have the body to hold that shape unless you want to use a G hook.

 

I would use either Red heart and an H or I hook or Caron Pounder (Natura) with an I or J hook depending on your gauge.

 

All the companies have to do is leave a slightly longer tail in the center.  Shouldn't be that hard, right?

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@RoseRed: Thanks! It's not my pattern but I am trying to make a purple version of the shawl for my mom for a Christmas present!

 

I think I am just going to try the yarn I have now. My mom picked it out and the purple color is very close to the color of the Lupus ribbon so I am just gonna give it my best shot! I plan on changing a few things, like 2 rows of double crochet in between instead of 1, and will for sure use the tips given to me on my last post for how I do the ribbons and may add a small stabilizing set of stitches to both sides rather than alternating sides like the pattern does. But like redrosesdz said, it'll be my interpretation of it and it will be all the more special when I give it to my mom!

 

@redrosesdz: I just went back and read your first post and yea, I have that same problem! Lol I saw a sewing pattern for a giant stuffed Toothless dragon plushie and when my family thought I was crazy for trying to make it.... I made it anyway! It turned out great lol. But sewing got old for me fast which is why I am now trying to go back to crocheting!

 

:ty  :manyheart

 

Thank you all so very much for your help! I am already on my second row (it's 300 stitches wide  :ohdear yes I altered there too) so it'll be a while before I've finished it but I will for sure post about it when it's done with some pictures!

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What size hook?  175 is four feet and 300 is almost double that.

Edited by RoseRed

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I am using a 5mm hook but the length I have of 300 stitches is the perfect size for the way I want it to fit. I've tried it on my mom several times and she's in love with the size so it's what I ended up going with! That and the fact that I can fit an even amount of ribbons on it is perfect!

 

And I ended up running to A.C. Moore tonight and grabbed some blue yarn as well to add into the shawl! Now it'll be a switch off and on between purple and blue! Now I just have to figure out how to add in another color without tying knots..... I tied all the purple together not realizing there was a way to attach or add a yarn in without knots.. :ohdear  Oh Well! I'll get it eventually! Lol 

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Start a new skein, whether it's for changing color or because you're at the end of an old skein, by doing the following...

 

1. Crochet up to where you want to change skeins, but don't finish the last stitch.

2. Drop the old yarn and pick up the new one.

3. Finish the stitch and continue crocheting.

4. After the next stitch, tug lightly on both the old yarn and the new tail.  Also, tuck both under your stitches for 1-3 stitches to anchor the change.

 

Also, never cut your yarn until the end (with 2 exceptions).  Carry the color along the side to use it again.  If you don't like the look of the sides with the colors, cover it up with a sc edge.

Exceptions:

1. If your skein has a knot, because the manufacturer tied ends together, cut it out and treat it like a skein change.

2. If your yarn breaks, cut clean ends and treat it like a skein change.

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Ok so I just got to the 3rd row (where the awareness ribbons are) and have tried 3 methods to making them and so far have not turned out too well.... Looking for any more advice/opinions on how to do these? :/

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I just saw your last post, sorry this is giving you so much trouble -- do you have a way of taking a picture of what you have, maybe we can see what your're not liking about the ribbons, we can better suggest something with a pic.  

 

Meanwhile I will try to swatch this a couple of different ways and see if anything jumps out at me....  

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OK, I followed the scarf not the shawl, since it was more swatch-size, thru row 3.  Scan shows round 2 facing.

 

From left to right:

First ribbon:

per pattern, except 3 sc around the chain not into the middle top 3 chains

Second ribbon:

row 2-chain 12, slst into the 4th chain from the beginning, chain 3, connect to row 1

row 3-per pattern except 3 sc into the middle top 3 chains, chain 3

Third ribbon:

row 2-chain 11, slst into the 5th chain from the beginning, chain 4, connect to row 1

row 3-1 sc into middle chain, ch 3

Fourth ribbon:

row 2- like second loop

row 3- 1 sc around top of loop, ch 3

Fifth ribbon:

row 2-per pattern

row 3-1 sc into middle chain, ch 1 (last ch 1 isn't called for, oops; however I'm thinking it would look better to add plain stitch to either side, from the beginning dc row)

 

When I made a single sc into the top of the loop, I added a chain on either side to maintain the stitch count.

 

In the other thread, I suggested twisting on the connected loops 2-4; I thought they looked better untwisted when actually doing them.

 

I personally liked the look of the fourth ribbon the best, the ribbons seem to stand out better with only 1 sc at the top, an extra chain between--but they are messy if not connected, as the pattern calls for.  I used a yarn very similar to RHSS and an H hook (I thought an F would be tight with this yarn for my personal tension).  

 

edit, my slip stitches were into 1 loop of the indicated chain, which left a little hole; might have looked better if I'd used 2 loops of the chain instead.

post-13625-0-34915200-1446582179_thumb.jpg

Edited by Granny Square

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Thank you Granny Square! After posting that I tried like 15 different ways and think I figured out a pretty good way to do it! I cut the original ch. 15 to 13, then did a sl st into the 5th stitch and chained 4 more. So far it looks pretty good and I am moving on to the 4th row and will update you then. 

 

Mine doesn't look as nice as yours so I may go back and redo the 3rd row but I want to see if they will look better once the row on top of them will help steady the ribbons or not.

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Gosh, you are getting a lot of practice on this! ;)

 

So your ribbon chain is a total of 17--it would look like ribbons 2 and 4 above, but with the legs 1 stitch longer.  

 

Good luck!  Post a pic when you are done!

Edited by Granny Square

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I am! I may go back and try your lopping only 1 at the top to see if it looks any better. Mine still don't look 100% like ribbons but I am hoping the more it gets worked on that the more they'll take the right shape! I will for sure post pictures when it's finished! I hope to get it done by the end of next week!

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