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2manythreads

"Learn How Book" Coats&Clark170-C Doily pattern- Help

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Anyone have this book? It's a vintage 1959 "Learn How Boook" by Coats &  Clark with instructions on how to knit, crochet, tat and etc. I am STUCK on their stupid doily pattern! Here it is on Ravelry

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/doily-with-treble-crochet/people

 

There's no pattern or info on it there at all. I specifically am having trouble with Row 22!!

 

EDITED- Round 22:

ch 4, tr in joining, *2 tr in next dc, ch 4, 2 tr in each of next 2 dc (ch-4 sp made); ch 3, (sc in next loop, ch 9) 3 times,sc in next loop, ch 3. Repeat from * all around.

 

I don't get where the ch 9 chain is supposed to end up?? In the next available loop (space)?

 

I think I just answered my own question by writing it out and seeing it with fresh eyes

 

apologies- is the answer to end the ch 9 with a sc in next loop? because that is what I think it is// I feel like a moron because now it looks so simple.

 

I often completely fouled it all up as I was trying to read it out of the book and do the rounds, then would get the different rounds confused and mix up the pattern! Oh nO! Had to "un-do" rows and start over. This is taking me for Ever to do.

 

 

Sighs

 

thanks in advance

 

ps I am a beginner and I do know how to read abbreviations, but sometimes I feel like something is missing from the written out patterns. I don't have any body except internet and books to help with my crochet.

 

PS again I find this site was VERY helpful in reading patterns: http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/tip_crochet.html

 

 

aside from all this mess if you have links to patterns that do not take TOO LONG I would appreciate them. I can make dish cloths scarves etc easily without using a pattern even so plz no more "do dishcloth pattern its easy"

Plus I want more "adult" patterns not stuff a child would make. I like doilies, those I make for other people none of it is for myself.

 

i have all the crochet websites bookmarked, but none of them state how LONG the patterns basically take TO make. I have the link to the "Five Hour Doily" too. I crochet fast even though I am a noob, and do know all most used stitches and have access to learn others. I understand everyone is different speeds but at least a basic "This takes about 25 hrs for exp. crocheter" would be a help.

 

anyway sorry so long

Edited by 2manythreads

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You just learned what I do when I'm confused.  I write it out, especially when there are repeats.  Writing it out in whatever way makes the most sense to me usually answers my questions and solidifies the pattern in my mind.

 

So,

2 tr in next dc, ch 4, 2 tr in each of next 2 dc (ch-4 sp made); ch 3, (sc in next loop, ch 9) 3 times,sc in next loop, ch 3

 

becomes,

2 tr in dc, ch 4, 2 tr in dc, 2 tr in dc, ch 3, sc in loop, ch 9, sc in loop, ch 9, sc in loop, ch 9, sc in loop, ch 3.

 

Of course, you'd write it out however it made sense to you.  :)

 

Timing is a tricky issue!  I've tried timing myself for how long it takes me to crochet an average skein of yarn.  It varies by pattern so much that, that didn't work.  Some patterns have taken me about 6 hours to go through a skein and others have taken me days to go through the same size skein.  Anyone else doing the exact same thing that I'm doing would have a completely different set of timing.  I've even found that redoing the same pattern at a later date took me a lot longer than the first time I did it, even though I understood it better the second time around.  I think that is because I work faster when I'm more interested and redoing a pattern is less interesting.  For example, I have a beautiful pattern for an extra long tunisian scarf.  The first time I finished it in 4 days.  I'm making it again for someone else and I've been working on it on and off for 3 weeks now.  So, trying to judge how long something takes an "average, experienced crocheter" would be next to impossible.

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I'm glad you figured it out, and also glad you posted because I think you solved a mystery for me.

 

I learned to crochet from a friend's mother when I was a teenager (around 1970), and I recall acquiring a little green 'how to' book at the time.  Somewhere in my many moves since then, that book disappeared (although other crochet books I had didn't).  I've always wondered what happened to it, but didn't remember the name (and this was way before Amazon anyway).  I googled the book listed on Ravelry, lo and behold that was IT (and there are used copies for sale).  Yay! :)

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Thanks a lot you guys! Yeah- I was on another thread here, I think it was helps for beginners thread from 2009, and someone commented that they always wrote out the patterns, and how that was a big help- and the funniest thing- I'd been struggling SO HARD for days and days over this pattern. Once I wrote it out and hit "Post" and I saw it written out, it was as easy as A-B-C and I was more rattled as to how I got that easy thing confused in the first place.

 

SO- the TRICK is to write out the pattern. Another thing that messed me up was getting the rounds mixed up. They are similar, so I was crocheting rnd 23 when I should have been doing rnd 22, etc. I got up this morning and saw all my mistakes lol.

 

PS to Granny Square: I found this Learn To Book at a thrift store a year or so ago, in a mixed bag of miscellaneous crochet/craft items. It is from that that I learned TO crochet actually. I didn't start crocheting until a few months ago, and didn't do it often at all. Now I am crocheting like gangbusters.

 

Thanks- but Problem Solved. Issue was "User Error"!

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I just looked up the book, because I was curious.  I see that Coats & Clark published it in 1959 and republished it in 1975, 1993, and current.  The first 3 editions are all 67 pages, but the new one is only 65 pages.  I wonder what changed over the publications.

 

1959

1975

1993

New

 

Does anyone know the differences?  I'm tempted to get all 4 just to see, but if they're duplicates I don't really want 4 of them.  LOL

 

ETA: I use a post-it note.  I stick it under the row/round that I'm on plus I make tick marks as I complete a row/round.  Some use row counters.  There are row counters that you can wear around your neck, round ones that fit on the end of your hook and other types.  I'm sure that there is an app out there for it, too.

Edited by redrosesdz

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What's interesting is this is the cover I remember (and the first link I found), also listed for 1975-version C, your 1975 link is version D.

 

It must have been pretty popular, Ravelry shows the same cover above but said over 18 million sold.  

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Yep mine is the 170-C which I assumed was 1959 (the art and the illustrations- very late '50's styling)

 

I did check yes it was pub. in 1975. Hmm darn I thought  had a '50's book :( awww. I like old stuff- I guess 1975 IS old NOW, lol! 

 

I can see why it was so popular: the "How-To's" are very user-friendly, just a breeze. I find that the older books have MUCH easier to understand instructions, something in our language or ?? has changed and not for the better in the past few decades, either that or publishers are more geared to publish whomever has the best P.R., rather than best content. I actually learned to crochet using that book- and I have a few craft instruction books lying around, many modern some old. The old style illustrations are very easy on the eyes and rather "catchy". Simple, not "busy". Books using a lot of glossy photo pages, and bright, neon-ish and trendy patterns get very dated and annoying to the reader.

 

I wish also what is different about the '75 pgs booklet as opposed to the '59 one? I wonder if the ebayers could tell?

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I bet the instructions & illustrations didn't change, maybe they updated some of the patterns--or pattern photos for the wearables maybe.  I've seen Coat's & Clark recycling some of the same patterns for threadwork items over the decades, comparing books I own from the '70s to much earlier ones at AntiquePatternLibrary.com.  There was one very distinctive small doily (strange construction) that I made from an online 1918 book for example, that I saw recycled as a pincushion in a 1950s book on that site.

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I'm sorry I didn't see this thread earlier as I have this booklet. The 1975 version (60 cents) 8th Edition-481. It shows a lot of use by me too. Tattered as it may be, I've made this doily many times (looks great in variegated thread) because it is so quick to make and an excellent choice for a beginner. I used it many times teaching all "my girls" how to crochet.

I haven't seen the newer issue, but noticed it states on the front cover on Amazon.com, "12 New Projects". That's odd since they made it a few pages less. I'm glad 2manythreads resolved the problem.

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Yes- thanks guys. I'm embarrassed that the huge issue was really nothing at all. All it took was for me to just write it out and it was so plain. I think seeing the pattern with the different rows all printed out confused me. I was doing the pattern, and looking down at the book to do the next row- arrghgh then found out 3 rows later that I had mixed up one row with another. I came to the conclusion that just crocheting and periodically looking down at the pattern in the book as I worked was a bad idea. It causes you to mess up your rows. So, what I did was just to start again as I didn't like my first row stitches anyway.

 

PS- this book is great! It's just a booklet, a little paperback. It is very simple, but includes important stitches like the knot stitch, afghan stitch, and so on. A LOT of information in one tiny package. This is why it sold millions.

 

I plan on giving it to a new crocheter when I am done with it, hopefully through the years they in turn will "pass it on" to someone else, lol like an heirloom ha ha. Cute booklet.

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Don't apologize, we were all beginners once and your comments may help someone else in the future.

 

What I often do in a written pattern with verbose directions in each row (instead of rewriting it) is make pencil slashes between logical steps of instructions to keep it all from running together (in my own copy of course).  

 

When a pattern has a lot of rows, I either pencil-tick off the row I've completed or use a paper clip to mark the current row--the latter more often when a hard-to-memorize, complex pattern says 'repeat rows 1-4 10 times', I just slide the paper clip up and down to mark where I am.  I've also used those sticky 'flags' to mark where I am. (something like this)

 

Occasionally, (and I don't think your little green book covers this), I'll diagram out the stitches.  

http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/chart_crochet.html

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Marking down your tasks as done in the book I actually did do light pencil slashes & even a Hi-Liter of different hues on rows, but somehow I still managed to foul it up. Something about writing it out, and seeing it afresh, created some kind of "Eureka" moment in my psyche that solved the problem. I do not know how it does, but it does (something for the scientific researchers to do topic on some day- unless they already have :) Someone in the topic on this site "tips for beginners" something like that- she wrote that she writes down the pattern, sometimes "in her own words". It was not the "putting into my own words" that fixed it but just the act of writing it and seeing it. I had, mentally, created a high and steep ladder of confusion for myself on account of just seeing the entire page of text, and the varying pattern instructions and it all just looked unsurmountable and confusing- if that makes any sense at all .

 

Thanks so much guys- and the diagramming out the stitches - also a really really good idea. I am not good at reading them yet- but I really like the concept OF using diagrams. It seems to me that it would be easier to comprehend a pattern, and also has the added advantage of being able to be understood in any language. Words, text, especially seeing repetitive instructions or similar but VERY different instructions : " 2 dc in next dc, dc in next dc, 2 dc in next dc, dc in each dc across to last 4 dc, [2 dc in next dc, dc in next dc"  <<<<< THAT is the sort of thing that confuses the brain to new people ha ha

 

a diagram may be an easier way to do it, seeing the pattern "in motion" so to speak.

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