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StrawberryWilliams

Size of the afghan stitch?

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I have been wanting to test out the afghan stitch and at the same time, crochet a different version of the Fourth Doctor's scarf from Doctor Who. I have made one before from rows of double crochet, but I don't feel like making it again due to the very long amount of time I used in making it. So looking around, I found a knitting pattern for a Tiny Posh Season Twelve Doctor Who scarf (Here), but I don't knit. So I am trying to figure out how to convert it from knitting to crochet and thought to my self "Would doing an afghan/Tunisian stitch work in place of the knit stitch?" So I would like to ask that question, if anyone knows?

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Hi, welcome to the ville!

 

the pattern you linked is done in garter stitch, in which each row is not very tall at all; the rows of garter stitch kind of compress together.   Also this is only going to be less than 4 inches wide according to the gauge.  

 

the pattern does not give a row gauge which would help a lot in converting it to crochet.

 

Have you done any Tunisian before?  

Edited by magiccrochetfan

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I would say that the thing to do is to experiment and see what it looks like in afghan stitch.  I think that one forward and back pass will equal 2 rows of garter, more or less.  the graphic on the pattern shows the number of "garter ridges" which is actually 2 rows.  so you may be able to just use those numbers and have it come out about the same length.  

 

I don't have much experience with Tunisian, so other posters may have better info about stitch height.  Still, everyone's gauge is different and it's always best to make a swatch to check your gauge for sure.  

 

If you have thought about learning to knit, garter stitch is about the simplest stitch pattern.  So this wouldn't be a bad first knitting project....even though it is quite long!  

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I have been trying to learn to knit, but have been having much difficulty learning on my own (No one in my family knows how to, videos and instructions are hard to learn, and my only friend that knew how is halfway across my state). So I was trying to convert to crochet. I will do this once I learn how to knit though. But for right now, I wanted to try this out with the Tunisian stitch. I still have a crazy amount of yarn from the last time I did the scarf. Thank you!

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You are welcome. It sounds like a good way to use up the yarn. For a scarf, exact dimensions usually aren't important so i think it will be fine even if it varies a little from the pattern. Have fun with it!

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Actually, you could make garter in Tunisian if you want the knit look, Tunisian has knit and purl stitches (that do look like the real knit counterpart).  

 

Tunisian stitches are close to sc in size, and a bit taller than knit stockinette and garter.  They are also chunkier than knit, and sc.

 

The pattern does give row gauge, it's 4.5 stitches=1", so 16 stitches is about 3.6 inches wide; the length is given as 4 feet 7 inches.  I'd choose at least a K hook for worsted weight yarn, over however many stitches that gives you the width you want, so you have a scarf with a nice drape.  You will need a Tunisian hook as well, you can make entrelac with a normal hook (usually rows are only 6 stitches) but you'd be pushing it for 3.6-4" on a regular hook.

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A couple of years ago I made a Tunisian crochet scarf with fingering weight yarn and the Tunisian Knit stitch. It turned out beautiful, however, it did seem like it took forever to make because of the light weight yarn.

I've included 2 following links for you to look at finished projects (someone else's) that look exactly like what my stitches looked like with Tks. Hope this helps.

Link 1   Link 2

Edited by ReniC

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Edited after I made a swatch - 

 

Forget what I said about trying Tunisian garter, it's not reversible like knit garter. 

 

If you use just the Tunisian knit stitch, it looks like smooth stockinette on one side and sort of like garter on the back.  It looks nicer IMO than 1 row of knit, 1 row of purl from the back.

Edited by Granny Square

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Another way to knit is to knook which is knitting with a hook. The hooks have a hole in the end where you run a lifeline through each hooked row as you go. You cast off the same as knitting and it goes really fast with the garter stitch since you are using only a hook and not two needles.

 

I got my set in Michael's and use it whenever I can over using needles.

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Ah, good point on knooking, a scarf would be an easy knook project.  A knit stitch is very nearly the same as a crochet slip stitch (so that part is easy), but keep in mind that a knit stitch is smaller than a sc stitch.  Not meaning to discourage you, knooking can be a good intro to knitting with needles, but you mentioned how slow the first project was and wanted something fast...

 

This jogged my memory that I did an experiment a while back to debunk a common myth that a crochet project uses 3x the yarn as an equivalent knitting project,it is a good illustration on stitch size.  I cut yarn into equal lengths and with the same diameter tool, knit  and crocheted strips of approximately the same width.  Note the garter strip is slightly smaller than the SC strip but it took 3x as many STITCHES to complete.

 

First photo--TSS (top, in pink - done later and I'd run out of the blue), then SC, garter, stockinette.  Beginning rows are lined up at the left of the photo, so they are shown sideways to the way they were worked. 

 

Second photo--original experiment, includes DC and a knit stockinette made to try to match the gauge of the crochet stitches - used 8mm hook to match 5mm hook gauge to give you an idea of how much smaller knit stitches are.

post-13625-0-66556600-1438272365_thumb.jpg

post-13625-0-92207300-1438272646_thumb.jpg

Edited by Granny Square

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Ah, good point on knooking, a scarf would be an easy knook project.  A knit stitch is very nearly the same as a crochet slip stitch (so that part is easy), but keep in mind that a knit stitch is smaller than a sc stitch.  Not meaning to discourage you, knooking can be a good intro to knitting with needles, but you mentioned how slow the first project was and wanted something fast...

 

This jogged my memory that I did an experiment a while back to debunk a common myth that a crochet project uses 3x the yarn as an equivalent knitting project,it is a good illustration on stitch size.  I cut yarn into equal lengths and with the same diameter tool, knit  and crocheted strips of approximately the same width.  Note the garter strip is slightly smaller than the SC strip but it took 3x as many STITCHES to complete.

 

First photo--TSS (top, in pink - done later and I'd run out of the blue), then SC, garter, stockinette.  Beginning rows are lined up at the left of the photo, so they are shown sideways to the way they were worked. 

 

Second photo--original experiment, includes DC and a knit stockinette made to try to match the gauge of the crochet stitches - used 8mm hook to match 5mm hook gauge to give you an idea of how much smaller knit stitches are.

 

Granny Square- What a great experiment with the different stitches. I always wondered about the difference in yardage but never made the time to explore because I don't knit. Thank you for sharing that.

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Knitting STITCHES are just knit and purl, slip stitches (move a stitch from left needle to right without making a new stitch) and yarn-overs (you wrap the yarn around the hook as if to make a stitch, but the yarn-over IS a stitch by itself; it's an increase, and leaves a hole -- it's used to make lace).

 

Decreases and increases involve just the above, but may add a variation of re-mounting the stitch or creating a new stitch out of a thread other than the one on your needle.

 

Purls are the reverse of Knit stitches -- a knit stitch is a purl on the back side, and a purl is a knit on the back side.

 

Knittinghelp.com is a wonderful resource.

 

Also, this site is great to learn to recognize your stitch mount, whether you knit combined or not it's a good idea to be able to 'read' your knitting.

 

Garter stitch is just knit stitches every row.  If working in the round, it's knit 1 round, purl 1 round.

 

Stockinette is knit on right side, purl on wrong side (so it all looks like smooth knit on the right side).  If working in the round, with no turning, it's just knit stitches.

 

Have fun!

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Knitting STITCHES are just knit and purl, slip stitches (move a stitch from left needle to right without making a new stitch) and yarn-overs (you wrap the yarn around the hook as if to make a stitch, but the yarn-over IS a stitch by itself; it's an increase, and leaves a hole -- it's used to make lace).

 

Decreases and increases involve just the above, but may add a variation of re-mounting the stitch or creating a new stitch out of a thread other than the one on your needle.

 

Purls are the reverse of Knit stitches -- a knit stitch is a purl on the back side, and a purl is a knit on the back side.

 

Knittinghelp.com is a wonderful resource.

 

Also, this site is great to learn to recognize your stitch mount, whether you knit combined or not it's a good idea to be able to 'read' your knitting.

 

Garter stitch is just knit stitches every row.  If working in the round, it's knit 1 round, purl 1 round.

 

Stockinette is knit on right side, purl on wrong side (so it all looks like smooth knit on the right side).  If working in the round, with no turning, it's just knit stitches.

 

Have fun!

THANK YOU! I figured that's what it meant, but thank you for explaining that to me!

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