Jump to content
DanielaPagliaruli

Differences yarn <--> thread

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone! :D

..I hope I started this topic in the right place.. :yes

 

Is there any difference between yarns and threads?

How do you identify them, if not clearly written on the ball/skein band? :think

 

Thank you soo much for any answer.

 

God bless us today! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not clear what you mean by differences.  Do you mean in size, quality, content, color, manufacturer, or what the different sizes are and what they are used to make?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not clear what you mean by differences.  Do you mean in size, quality, content, color, manufacturer, or what the different sizes are and what they are used to make?

 

:ty  for your answer.

 

Let me explain.. :)

1)What kind of product should the term 'thread' indicate?

2)What kind of product should the term 'yarn' indicate?

 

If we have 2 different terms, it is because we have 2 different products.

If I had in front of me these 2 products, without these terms on the ball band,

I could not say if I see a yarn or a thread.

 

I hope I have been clear... :)

 

God bless you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the US, "crochet thread" (or crochet cotton) is used to denote a strong smooth cotton in relatively small diameters.  Sometimes other plant fibers are used, such as bamboo http://www.coatsandclark.com/Products/KnittingCrochet/Threads/Size10/Aunt+Lydias+Bamboo.htm (this is very soft and limp)

or linen http://www.etsy.com/listing/123528659/20-sale-lace-weight-linen-yarn-size-10 (I really want to order something from her someday!)

 

Yarn can be just about anything really, that can be manipulated with a crochet hook or knitting needles. There are now "yarns " which are really strips of cloth for making the ruffle scarves you may have seen.   Yarn could be even thinner than thread, if you compare a laceweight yarn and a size 5 thread for example.  

 

Then you can find things that are usually used for weaving that are quite similar to crochet thread http://halcyonyarn.com/products/yarn/083.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the US, "crochet thread" (or crochet cotton) is used to denote a strong smooth cotton in relatively small diameters.  Sometimes other plant fibers are used, such as bamboo http://www.coatsandclark.com/Products/KnittingCrochet/Threads/Size10/Aunt+Lydias+Bamboo.htm (this is very soft and limp)

or linen http://www.etsy.com/listing/123528659/20-sale-lace-weight-linen-yarn-size-10 (I really want to order something from her someday!)

 

Yarn can be just about anything really, that can be manipulated with a crochet hook or knitting needles. There are now "yarns " which are really strips of cloth for making the ruffle scarves you may have seen.   Yarn could be even thinner than thread, if you compare a laceweight yarn and a size 5 thread for example.  

 

Then you can find things that are usually used for weaving that are quite similar to crochet thread http://halcyonyarn.com/products/yarn/083.html

 

:ty  for your kind help.

 

How do you realize that the product you have in front of you is a yarn? Or is a thread?

Usually, I see that thread is thinner that yarns, but you write that yarn could be thinner that thread.

I agree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, hmmmm.  I am really not sure that it matters whether something is a yarn or a thread.  I guess really all thread is yarn.  But not all yarn is thread because i think a thread has to be small, and has to be smooth, and traditionally has been made from plant fiber.  But you could make a dress from thread, and you could make a doily from yarn.  

 

What difference does it make to you whether the material is a yarn or a thread?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What difference does it make to you whether the material is a yarn or a thread?  

 

My curiosity is about the different meanings of these two terms.

I can not say 'thread' or 'yarn' without knowing what I am talking about. :hook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think there is a very rigid definition, it is just tradition that the word "thread" means anything in terms of crocheting materials.  

I will be interested to see what other people have to say about the question.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a craft store near you that you can go in and read the labels and check out the difference?  I'm sure a sales associate could help with this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding thread sizes versus yarn sizes shown on a label, in US and UK they are both backward from each other.

 

In other words, for YARN the higher the US size number or higher UK # of 'plies', the bigger the yarn.

 

For THREAD, the higher number for the size, the smaller the thread.  I think US and UK size numbers are the same for thread.

 

In the UK system, the word 'ply' is misleading.  Most yarn and thread are made up of multiple stands twisted together, a strand is the same as a ply.  The UK 'ply' size system has nothing to do with the actual number of plies/strands in a yarn.  There is very tiny crochet thread that is made from 6 strands, and bulky yarn made from 1 strand.

Edited by Granny Square

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a craft store near you that you can go in and read the labels and check out the difference?  I'm sure a sales associate could help with this.

 

Dear RoseRed,

first of all I want to thank you for your help. :)

Here where I live there are some craft/hobbies store,

and on the balls bands I only read the word 'filato' that could mean both 'yarn' or 'thread'.

 

Thank you again.

 

God bless you! :D

Edited by JesusIsTheLord

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding thread sizes versus yarn sizes shown on a label, in US and UK they are both backward from each other.

 

In other words, for YARN the higher the US size number or higher UK # of 'plies', the bigger the yarn.

 

For THREAD, the higher number for the size, the smaller the thread.  I think US and UK size numbers are the same for thread.

 

In the UK system, the word 'ply' is misleading.  Most yarn and thread are made up of multiple stands twisted together, a strand is the same as a ply.  The UK 'ply' size system has nothing to do with the actual number of plies/strands in a yarn.  There is very tiny crochet thread that is made from 6 strands, and bulky yarn made from 1 strand.

 

Granny Square,

thank you for your answer.

I see that there is a lit (big) confusion about the meanings of some words:

yarn, thread, ply, strands.

This is the reason why I started searching, and I started this topic. :think

Now more things are becoming clearer for me.

 

Thank you again,

God bless you. :waving

Edited by JesusIsTheLord

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe if Ville'er Wheat sees this she could answer as she is a retailer of fiber and such and is a plethora of valuable information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe if Ville'er Wheat sees this she could answer as she is a retailer of fiber and such and is a plethora of valuable information.

 

Dear ReniC,

Thank you for your answer. :)

Hope that she will see this post.

 

God bless you for your help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×