O-Castitatis-Lilium

what is the difference?

7 posts in this topic

I am a little confused on the difference between the outside of a piece and the inside of the inside of a piece. How can you tell the difference between the two, so far, everything looks the same to me, there isn't really a difference. Though, I know there has to be because, the words are brought up quite a bit. Is there a special way to tell, or a special way to stitch an outside pattern and an inside pattern?

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as you are working the stitches, the side facing you is generally considered the "right" side.  when you work flat in rows, and turn the piece before each new row, you have alternating "right" and "wrong" side rows so in reality both sides look the same.  Paterns often designate a "right" side because there is some shaping, for example the right and left sides of the front of a cardigan.  the pattern may say to end with a wrong side row for example.  its just a way to keep track of where you are in the pattern.  and if i were making tow front pieces i would make them identical an flip one over, unless the diference between the rows was so great that it really wouldn't look good.   most things seem pretty reversible to me.  

 

if you are working in the round and never turning the work, you will have one side that is all "right"and one side all "wrong".  its really up to you which side to show.  

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And just to add to what's already been said... Sometimes in a pattern, there is a particular stitch that will only show on the right side (RS). If you are working on something and it states in a given row that it is the right side (RS), just put a marker there. You can use a stitch marker or tie a piece of yarn (in a different color). This way, it may help later on in the pattern.

 

Welcome to Crochetville, by the way! (And your avatar is so very pretty.)

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as you are working the stitches, the side facing you is generally considered the "right" side.  when you work flat in rows, and turn the piece before each new row, you have alternating "right" and "wrong" side rows so in reality both sides look the same.  Paterns often designate a "right" side because there is some shaping, for example the right and left sides of the front of a cardigan.  the pattern may say to end with a wrong side row for example.  its just a way to keep track of where you are in the pattern.  and if i were making tow front pieces i would make them identical an flip one over, unless the diference between the rows was so great that it really wouldn't look good.   most things seem pretty reversible to me.  

 

if you are working in the round and never turning the work, you will have one side that is all "right"and one side all "wrong".  its really up to you which side to show.  

 

 

And just to add to what's already been said... Sometimes in a pattern, there is a particular stitch that will only show on the right side (RS). If you are working on something and it states in a given row that it is the right side (RS), just put a marker there. You can use a stitch marker or tie a piece of yarn (in a different color). This way, it may help later on in the pattern.

 

Welcome to Crochetville, by the way! (And your avatar is so very pretty.)

ok...I think I get what you guys are trying to say. Like with a popcorn stitch, something like that would only be seen from the outside of the shirt or hat...and it woudl be smooth or even concave on the other side, the side that is touching the skin or head right?

 

Yeah, a lot of the patterns I see Magiccrochetfan, seem to be reversible, as there is no real right or wrong side. It's rather confusing though looking at a piece and being like O.O...oh no...I..I can't tell the difference...>> did I do it right?  XD LOL!!!

 

Yeah, I actually found some really cute stitch markers. I got them at the dollar store. Well, they are bobby pins, or..so they say they are but, the ends are round as a ball but, they don't have the ball on the end like a typical bobby pin would. That and they aren't even ridged either to hold the hair...and they aren't that tight so...I think they were mislabeled but, i bought a couple just to try out, if they work good, I will be heading over to get more for sure ^-^ lol the dollar stores around here have EVERYTHING lol

 

Thank you both for the advice and help! ^-^

 

 

 

Edit: and thank you for the complement on my picture TCarra, I found it actually on google images, I really liked it. it has the watermark on it but, unfortunately  I can't get it to show because the picture is too big lol. Though I wish I could take pictures as nice as that one XD lol

Edited by O-Castitatis-Lilium

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Also, if a pattern doesn't state which which is the right side (RS) or wrong side (RS), it is generally assumed that the first row or round is the right side.

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Also, if a pattern doesn't state which which is the right side (RS) or wrong side (RS), it is generally assumed that the first row or round is the right side.

ah ok, good thing to know ^-^ Thank you ^-^

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When working in the round, Right/Outside and Wrong/Inside are fairly obvious.  And the analogy of Popcorn stittch is excellent.

 

When someone is relatively new to the craft,  one basic is always "be consistent".  

 

My "method" for keeping track starts with the chain.    As one fo those who always make "extra" to avoid counting wrong, I usually have a "tail".   Whether you are left or right handed, the 1st row worked into the chain is usually ROW ! and the side facing you is the right side.

 

At the end of that row, for a right handed person, the "tail" will be dangling on your left side.  So, when working flat, for a right handed person, if the tail is on the left, then the RIGHT/OUTside of the work is facing you.  If the tail is on YOUR right, then the WRONG/INside is facing you. 

 

This method also eliminates needing a stitch marker.   It is easy enough to remove the tail later and given its usefulness throughout the project well worth the penny or two worth of yarn.

 

Enjoy The Making

 

Wheat

 

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