Jump to content
Stencherific

Advantages of wool?

Recommended Posts

I've never crocheted with wool. I've made 4 granny square afghans, 3 out of acrylic and one out of cotton. I found that the cotton was really heavy when all was said and done, which I didn't really like. The acrylic wasn't too bad, but I'm experiencing some pilling on one of my blankets, which I'm sure is just due to the brand I used.

 

I've heard people rave about wool for afghans but have yet to try it out. What are your thoughts about wool? Any favorite brands? Are there any particular advantages that wool has over other kinds of yarn? I've noticed that its more expensive so I'm just wondering if it's worth it for my next project.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my opinion....I wouldn't use wool in an afghan unless you were to use a super wash wool. 100% wool would have to be handwashed to avoid felting.

 

I love the idea of an all wool afghan....think how warm and cozy it would be!! I just can't bring myself to spend that kind of money on the amount of yarn it would take for a large afghan....I also wouldn't want to hand wash it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Washing a non-superwash wool afghan would be a chore I'm not up to dealing with. Superwash, aka "washable wool" would be the way to go if you want to use a natural fiber.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For an afghan i think a good compromise would be a wool-acrylic blend like Lion Woolease or Plymouth Encore. They have a little of the cushy texture of wool, are less expensive, and machine wash/dry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For an afghan i think a good compromise would be a wool-acrylic blend like Lion Woolease or Plymouth Encore. They have a little of the cushy texture of wool, are less expensive, and machine wash/dry.

 

I TOTALLY agree...I love these yarns for afghans! If you want to go the washable wool route, BEWARE. I used what was supposed to be a "washable" wool (Ella Rae's), but the first time I tossed the afghan into the machine, the ENTIRE thing felted. This was with following the washing instructions, too. :eek :eek :eek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I TOTALLY agree...I love these yarns for afghans! If you want to go the washable wool route, BEWARE. I used what was supposed to be a "washable" wool (Ella Rae's), but the first time I tossed the afghan into the machine, the ENTIRE thing felted. This was with following the washing instructions, too. :eek :eek :eek

 

 

The Ella Rae brand has several different wool offerings - Classic, Superwash Classic (hand washable) and the newer part of the brand, the 4 weights of Lace Merino. Some are more washable than others - all have slightly different care instructions on the lable.

 

Which Ella Rae yarn did you use?

 

And what method did you use for washing.

 

Hope this makes sense.

 

Wheat

looking for more questions to distract me from the results of anthestic wearing off after extraction

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am one of those who rave about wool - and there are many different ones that I use for different purposes.

 

It is important to know that there is a difference between "Washable" (all wool is when properly handled) and MACHINE WASHABLE>

 

ALL yarn with wool content will "full" and that is one of the advantage for its use in an crochet afghan - you can work slightly looser, so less fatiguing but still have a warm cover when done.

 

100% Wool has other advantages, although for anything that will cover the sleeping - it is self extinguishing which means unlike a yarn which contains acrylic or polyester, it will not melt onto the skin - and is why I never make baby blankets in acrylics or other petroleum based fibers.

 

Another wool advantage is its ability to hold liquid without losing its loft. This means unlike a cotton which absorbs liquid but collapse against the skin thus causing warmth to be pulled away from the body, depending on the wool treatment can hold 2-3 times its own weight in liquid and still insulate the body without drawing away body heat.

 

Acrylics will sometimes hold some water, but not really - I know some will disagree with this, but there have been lab tests done over the years to compare various fibers ability to absorb and retain fluids. There are some manmade fibers that will wick away moisture, but most of those yarns are not usually used in yarns intended for hand work and are certainly not in what anyone would call the least expensive (although sometimes found in mid range) yarns

 

My planning, for any baby I really really care about (like a family member or God child) I buy sufficient yarn to make an adult size afghan and then add to it each year until it is full sized.

 

 

Hope this makes sense.

 

Wheat

looking for more questions to distract me from the results of anthestic wearing off after extraction

Edited by wheat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...