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Beaglelady

knooking vs tunsian

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No.

 

In tunisian, you'll work the first part picking up the stitches from right to left. The second part is removing the stitches from left to right. You cannot pull the hook all the way through because it has a stopper on the end.

 

In knooking you'll eventually pull the cord all the way through the row.

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after watching a video - aren't they more or less the same???

:think

 

Because the knook stitches are picked up very similarly as Tunisian crochet stitches, initially they appear to be the same. But, knooking is literally knitting. True, literal, actual knitting.... with a crochet hook.

 

Tunisian crochet isn't knitting. Although there are loops all across the hook at the beginning, you then close the loops at the end of the row.

 

Tunisian crochet isn't knitting because there is a closing chain running through the top of each row. It is the only true difference between knitting and Tunisian. Tunisian crochet stitches are closed after each row. Knitting stitches are just built one on top of the other.

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Okay....makes sense to me. I've tried Tunisian, but just don't quite get the hang of it. Knooking looks very interesting though. Thank you all for the info!!!

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I have knooking somewhere on my future to do list. Do you use knitting patterns or crochet, or special knooking patterns?

 

Sherry

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Never mind, I found the answer while going through some of the other posts. Thanks.

 

 

Sherry

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Knooking is on my todo list for this summer. As soon as I find the knooking tools I need. Here in BC where I live, its not easy to find. Micheals does not carry them yet.

Going into the US next week on holidays and plan to search there for them. I cannot wait to try this ..

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Knooking is on my todo list for this summer. As soon as I find the knooking tools I need. Here in BC where I live, its not easy to find. Micheals does not carry them yet.

Going into the US next week on holidays and plan to search there for them. I cannot wait to try this ..

I haven't found any knooking supplies in actual stores here. I haven't really looked either. If you can't find anything, online might be the way to go.

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You can find suggestions of ways to make your own knook by filing down the end of a hook (so there isn't a 'bump' when you insert the cord) and drilling a hole...

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I wanna learn, but haven't had the time or patience to yet. I seen on Knitty Gritty, I think that was the name of the show, how to crochet with knitting needles. Was kinda neat!

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I just watched a video. Am I right that the cord does not stay in but is pulled out with the next row? Thanks. Emmy

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I just watched a video. Am I right that the cord does not stay in but is pulled out with the next row? Thanks. Emmy

 

Once you've completed the row on top of the prior row, the cord can come out of the prior row. It's just there to hold the stitches temporarily until you get the next row on there.

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If you already knit, probably not.  I do knit, and found knooking more difficult (fiddly).  There are 2 differences from real knitting--using a hook for the 'right' needle, and using the hook's cable tail as the left needle.  The part that bugged me was knitting the stitches off the floppy cable -- IMO it's easier to knit the stitches off a firm left needle that holds the stitches cleanly above the fabric instead of digging them off a limp string that buries itself into the fabric.  YMMV

 

Knooking might be easier for some that have hand health issues.  Crochet bugs my wrists more than knitting and me helps to alternate project types--but, I knit overhand and crochet pencil style.

 

If you aren't already a knitter, you might find it easier to get the hang of because the tool is familiar, and you aren't wrangling both a new tool and a new way to make stitches.

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If you already knit, probably not.  I do knit, and found knooking more difficult (fiddly).  There are 2 differences from real knitting--using a hook for the 'right' needle, and using the hook's cable tail as the left needle.  The part that bugged me was knitting the stitches off the floppy cable -- IMO it's easier to knit the stitches off a firm left needle that holds the stitches cleanly above the fabric instead of digging them off a limp string that buries itself into the fabric.  YMMV

 

Knooking might be easier for some that have hand health issues.  Crochet bugs my wrists more than knitting and me helps to alternate project types--but, I knit overhand and crochet pencil style.

 

If you aren't already a knitter, you might find it easier to get the hang of because the tool is familiar, and you aren't wrangling both a new tool and a new way to make stitches.

Thanks, I know how to knit, but I don't do it much,now.  Crochet is easier to keep up with the pattern and much easier to replace stitches after ripping.

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