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#1Crochetfan

Rug yarn and hot pads?!

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:)I'm wondering why rug yarn isn't as popular as I remember as a child. Mom used to have plenty for making hot pads. Not many craft stores carry it and I don't think hot pads today use this yarn much any more.

 

Why I wonder?

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:)I'm wondering why rug yarn isn't as popular as I remember as a child. Mom used to have plenty for making hot pads. Not many craft stores carry it and I don't think hot pads today use this yarn much any more.

 

Why I wonder?

 

I've seen a lot of rug yarn at Hobby Lobby. But as far as patterns, no, haven't seen those. I always thought the rug yarn was for doing latch hook.

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I've seen labels for rug yarn from "way back when." Once upon a time, rug yarn was 100% cotton.

 

Nowadays, the rug yarn I see is 100% acrylic/polyester/something from petroleum/oil.

 

It is very unwise / unsafe to make hotpads or trivets out of yarn that will MELT at high temperatures. It can stick to your hand, your arm, your table, gluing together the source of the high temp and whatever is on the other side of said hotpad/trivet.

 

DCM

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I was thinking the same thing - that rug yarn use to be 100% cotton but isn't now. So it is something else that now shouldn't be used for pot holders or hot pads.

 

I've always used worsted weight yarn for latch hook. Don't think I've ever seen it done using rug yarn, but maybe.

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Thank you, all of you, for your thoughts.

 

MomtoPBJ>>I've seen a lot of rug yarn at Hobby Lobby. But as far as patterns, no, haven't seen those. I always thought the rug yarn was for doing latch hook.
The older vintage patterns used rug yarn a lot. :)

 

DogCatMom>>I've seen labels for rug yarn from "way back when." Once upon a time, rug yarn was 100% cotton.
Yeah, you're right that it must have been completely cotton. Acrylic stuff is definitely not a smart move to use for hot pads.:lol

 

Bailey>>>I was thinking the same thing - that rug yarn use to be 100% cotton but isn't now. So it is something else that now shouldn't be used for pot holders or hot pads.
Thanks, also for you're imput.:)

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I still use rug yarn to actually make rugs....LOL. Most of the yarn I use I find at yard sales and such. They make great rugs for patios, porches, for pets to lay on or put in the bottom of the tub or wash pan to keep pets from slipping when giving baths. I also keep them at the back steps for wiping feet and to keep the icy weather from making the steps too slick. I try and keep a couple larger ones in the trunk of the car in case I get stuck. Just throw them under the drive wheels and they give you a bit of traction when the surface is slick. They can handle rain, snow, sleet and sun. You just throw them in the washer and dryer and they are ready to go again. Usually the yarn is heavy enough so you only have to use one strand instead of two for rugs. The yarn works a bit better than rag strips and lasts a lot longer.

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papersmiles>>I still use rug yarn to actually make rugs....LOL. Most of the yarn I use I find at yard sales and such. They make great rugs for patios, porches, for pets to lay on or put in the bottom of the tub or wash pan to keep pets from slipping when giving baths. I also keep them at the back steps for wiping feet and to keep the icy weather from making the steps too slick. I try and keep a couple larger ones in the trunk of the car in case I get stuck. Just throw them under the drive wheels and they give you a bit of traction when the surface is slick. They can handle rain, snow, sleet and sun. You just throw them in the washer and dryer and they are ready to go again. Usually the yarn is heavy enough so you only have to use one strand instead of two for rugs. The yarn works a bit better than rag strips and lasts a lot longer.
Great idea!:)

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The rug yarn I remember was so rough and scratchy. It was murder on my hands. I do remember making "porch doilies" from macrame cord. They were very durable. And it seems that macrame has made a resurgence. Oh, wait-is remembering macrame another sign of being an old geezer?

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It's funny you should mention rug yarn. I was in AC Moore last week and a lady was asking the associate about rug yarn. She looked at her (she was too young to remember it) and had no idea what she was talking about. I then nicely chimed in that I remember it and haven't seen it in years. The lady said she would make mittens from it and be able to shovel snow and her hands would be totally dry and it was the best to use for that.

 

Somewhere in my stash of donated yarn from years ago, I remember seeing just a few skeins of it. But I do have patterns, again from years ago, that call for it also.

 

Used to be made by Aunt Lydia.

 

Oh, off topic on rug yarn but AC Moore (at least by me) raised their RedHear Super Saver to $2.89 from $2.79.

 

LI Roe

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I learned to crochet with Aunt Lydia's Rug Yarn and used it for most of what I made as a child and teen.

 

Hobby Lobby carries some sort of rug yarn in their latch hook dept., but there isn't much to choose from.

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