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thepunkrockinchick

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I'm trying to get used to crocheting with thread. I like doilies, but my tension is a little off when I use size 10 thread. I recently made a doily from size 3. I actually like it. I chose a pattern that wasn't too lacy, just enough. Do you think it seems lazy to use size 3? I suppose lazy isn't the right word.. maybe tacky? :lol I know that is a silly question, but it isn't as delicate of course... I guess I might feel that using size 3 is an insult to the threadie culture. ;)

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I think using a smaller size thread than you are used to just takes practice. Maybe do a few more small doilies in #3 to get used to it and then give #10 another try. You might have to make a few pieces you aren't too proud of before you get the feel for it. I used #10 for a long time and then tried #20 and found I liked it a lot. But when I went back to #10, it felt like rope. So it's just a matter of getting used to it. Good luck.

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I love using any size thread, whether it be a size 3 or a size 30. It helps some people immensely to use a larger handled hook. Even though they are great for any like myself with arthritis problems, it also helps to control the hook more. What I also do is slip on two little, purple, foam hook cushions then slip over each cushion a foam or gel pencil grip. This gives the same thickness (sometimes even better) as a bamboo handled hook.

Edited by ReniC

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When I first started working with thread I used embroidery floss. Learning my tension on size 10 thread took a while for me. I don't think it's an insult - I think it's AWESOME that you're trying!

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My opinion is that if you like it, who cares? There are people who like to crochet with size 50 thread and do lovely work with it. Ditto for 30, 20, 10, 5 and 3. I say do what you are comfortable with and don't worry about it. I'm sure your work is gorgeous. If you want to move to another size later you can, and if you find you really like size 3, then stay there. :hug

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Thank you ladies for your comments. :) I wasn't really sure what I thought about it. It is true.. that people use much smaller thread than size 10, so what is the difference if I use size 3? LOL

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If you don't like the finished product, pull it out. Better than being dissatified with it. I do a lot of that using # 10 for doll clothes patterns that call for ww.

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I'm not a threadie, but it's always because I've felt so uncomfortable working with it. Clumsy, you know? But you've inspired me to give it a try with a size 3 and work my way down to a smaller thread as I get used to working with it. I'd love to try some of those lacy patterns out there.

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I'm not a threadie, but it's always because I've felt so uncomfortable working with it. Clumsy, you know? But you've inspired me to give it a try with a size 3 and work my way down to a smaller thread as I get used to working with it. I'd love to try some of those lacy patterns out there.

 

I used an e hook, but I do crochet tight sometimes, so you might want to use a d if an e doesn't work for you. :) I've made bookmarks and things like that before with size 10 thread, but doilies are a whole new ballgame (for me). It took me an evening to make a 10" doily-the original pattern was 7". I plan on making a few more. I just need to block my creation.. I've blocked bags made from ww cotton, so I imagine it would probably be easier, because it is easier to manipulate the finish item.

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Use whatever size you feel comfortable with....it will still look beautiful. I switch back and forth between thread and yarn projects...it gives me a break from using the same size. I have also taken doily patterns and used yarn to make decorative rugs.

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If your finished project looks good in size 3...why not? I use all kinds of sizes from 10 down for doilies, but I like 3 for dishclothes, string bags, etc... You might find that some patterns work better than others in that size, but I wouldn't worry about comparing to anyone else. Thread crocheters, like all crocheters, have way better things to do with their time than fuss at each other about minor differences, right? I'm always happy to hear about someone new working in thread--don't want it to become a lost art!

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I don't think it matters. A doily will take the size of the size thread plus the size needle. Whatever you feel comfortable with is great. Hey! You can use kite string, nylon clothesline, ripped t-shirts, whatever. A doily would look great any way.

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Like everybody says, if YOU like it well. it really does not matter. If, however, you really want a thready, lacy little thing I will pass on some advice that I found helpful (eventually); and that is never to try to learn by using a larger thread and hook. Dive straight in and struggle away with the small stuff! It works, in a surprisingly short time you will be threading away with the best of them. It is though supposed to be enjoyable, so do what you enjoy, well done for even trying,

:c9

 

tas

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I started making things by using size 30 or 40 (I dont remember) thread and .80mm steel hook, I did not have many choices to pick from, we were in Japan, didn't know language/crochet/thread/hooks, so on. Well, my first doily turned out like a hat, I think I had terrible tension, since I did not know symbols, written inst. it was all I could do from pictures.

Now, I make everything out of every size of threads and yarns,

 

Just like everyone says, if you like it go for it, size 3 makes very nice coasters and finishes quickly, when you feel more comfortable go for 5 or 10, I am sure you can make everything you like, I did :)

 

Demet

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Your doing great and starting ways that most people do. I started with size 3 and then size 5 thread, same pattern as size 3, then size 10 thread same pattern, then moved on to size 20 same pattern, then 30 etc....I have went up to size 80 and don't like it, the highest I'll go is 30 but I am happy with size 10. Rarely size 20 depending on color. Keep going.......you'll get it as we all did. Practice is great to. Do simple patterns till you get the hang of it. and remember Happy crocheting and have fun.

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I discovered when I started thread that I had to hold the thread differently in my left hand than I do yarn. Yarn I just wrap around my index finger, thread I have to add my middle finger and my pinky into the mix, otherwise my tension is all off and I either hold too tight or the thread gets away from me. It took some time to get used to it, but now (after that bedspread) I can switch very easily between the two - and I actually have another thread project in my head (I cannot believe it!!!!)

Edited by chillrr

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You are right about tension having to be much more carefully controlled with thread than yarn. Thread is much less forgiving. It's something we threadies forget when we say it's only using a thinner medium and a smaller hook.

 

My advice to beginning threadies is contrary. Start with a small thread size and work up to a larger, if you still want to.

 

What do you tell threadies when they try yarn the first time? (I go nuts when I switch to yarn because I'm so used to holding thread tight.)

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I love crocheting with thread....I've only used #10 and know when I finally decide to got smaller it's going to be a bit of a challenge. Right now I'm doing a lot of projects in ww and sport yarn. Even switching between the different sizes in yarn can be a challenge at times. Like a few others have stated...you've got to just dive in and take the challenge!

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I have used all size threads for doilies, and it depends on what type of doily, how intricate and what it is being used for. I like using the 3 for ones that will take a lot of abuse and wear and tear, along with frequent washing. I don't block the thicker threads so they are usually a filet or plainer design. I reserve the real thin threads, even sewing threads for lace edgings mostly. I find that I prefer 10/20 for table toppers/center pieces. It is all personal preference, as stated by others, whatever you are comfortable with, and how much you want to challenge yourself and expand your expertise. Lazy isn't an issue, it's texture and design to make your art work for you.

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High fives to you for giving thread a try. I just received my copy of "Crochet so Fine: Exquisite Designs with Fine Yarn" and it has some of the most gossamer fashions using everything from fingering yarn to super fine yarn to thread. The possibilities are unlimited and I think you are very creative for tackling a pattern using a different material than called for.

 

I learned to crochet from my mom and all we used was size 30 to size 10 thread. Goodness, the first item I crocheted was so tight it curled...ugh! The second time it was suggested I use a bigger hook so I decided three times as big would be even better. YUCK....the doily turned out looking like really holey fisherman's net. It took a lot of tries before my hands/fingers could both "feed" the thread and also control the tension. I still use a great deal of thread because I like the elegant lace look and have started experimenting with doily designs in clothing for the same reason.

 

Good luck and keep on stitching.

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Hi Punkrockchick, I recently tried a project using thread crochet and used #10. My finished project came out a few inches smaller that it should have. Someone suggested using a slightly bigger hook. I think I used a size 7 steel hook for it, I might try again using a size 8 steel hook. It was a pattern for potholder bloomers i found on best free crochet. Even though my bloomers came out smaller than usuall, I want to make more projects with thread including a tablecloth for my kitchen table. But knowing that I am a tight crocheter to begin with, I know I am going to have to make some adjustments to either my style, thread size or hook size.

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Whatever you feel comfortable with. As long as the finished project makes you happy. I don't feel you're being lazy at all, you're just learning to work with the thread. Working with the finer type threads can take some time. I am sure eventually you'll be able to work with the size 10 or even finer threads.

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Hi Norwinmom, before you invest in a new hook - size 8 is actually smaller than size 7, the numbered steel hook sizes work the opposite way as the US lettered yarn hooks do :hook

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Hi Norwinmom, before you invest in a new hook - size 8 is actually smaller than size 7, the numbered steel hook sizes work the opposite way as the US lettered yarn hooks do :hook

 

Oh, I'm glad I found that out now. I will keep in mind next trip to the craft store. Thank you. :)

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