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Half single crochet


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I got a phone call from my cousin today and she said a friend of her's had a pattern with a half single crochet stitch in it. I said are you sure, and she said yes. I told her to get the pattern so we could see it, and that I would look around and see if I could find something on it. Has anyone ever heard of it or know where I can find information on it? Thanks in advance.

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I finished up the CGOA Sticthes and Techinques program (which I'm waiting on the okay to mail in), there is no 'half single crochet stich' there. If there were one, I'm sure it would be included. SO I tend to agree with the other ladies, slip stitch.

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That is why I told her to get the pattern so I could see it. I told her it was a slip stitch, but she kept saying half single crochet. I will let you know what the pattern says.

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If the pattern is in UK terms, instead of American terms, it could mean a hdc. Because sc for them is a dc for us...so a half sc for them may be a half dc for us?

 

actually the US dc is a triple or treble crochet in UK terms http://www.crochetville.org/forum/showthread.php?t=38393

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I tend to agree with Heart, The UK term for slip stitch is exactly the same for US.

If they process a sc the way we do a double. Then to them a half single crochet has to be a half double crochet. No where does the UK terminology mention a half double, so it stands to reason it is why we don't recognize the term half single.

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I tend to agree with Heart, The UK term for slip stitch is exactly the same for US.

If they process a sc the way we do a double. Then to them a half single crochet has to be a half double crochet. No where does the UK terminology mention a half double, so it stands to reason it is why we don't recognize the term half single.

 

the US half double is the UK half treble.

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I have a couple of ideas about the term "half single crochet," but getting all my thoughts out will take a few minutes....

 

In each case below, I'm providing the complete list of terms as each book has published it.

 

First, The Happy Hooker, by Debbie Stoller, published 2006. On page 44, she gives the following glossary for American and British English crocheters:

 

American British

 

Slip Stitch Single Crochet

Single Crochet Double Crochet

Half-Dbl. Croch. Half Treble Crochet

Double Crochet Treble Crochet

Triple Crochet Double Treble

Double Triple Treble Treble

 

Right now, for a personal bibliography project, I have a library copy of Donna Kooler's Encyclopedia of Crochet (pub. 2002). Her list of American-to-British stitch names agrees with The Happy Hooker, except that Kooler uses "treble" where Stoller uses "triple" in the American stitch names.

 

An older book in my possession, Louise Calder's Creative Crochet (pub. 1979), has a different list of equivalents. Here 'tis:

 

American British

 

chain stitch chain stitch

slip stitch slip stitch

single crochet double crochet

half-double cro. half treble crochet

double crochet treble

treble double treble

double treble triple treble

 

Thus showing us that stitch names, even in the U.S., have changed over the past 30 or so years (e.g., triple vs. treble).

 

But I did find some basis for a "half single" in a Spanish-language book, El gran libro del Crochet, by Alejandra Temprano. But what's this?! If I look at the illustrations (and my ability to read Spanish), these are the basics:

 

U.S. English Spanish (South America)

 

Chain stitch Punto cadena

Slip stitch Punto enano (or Punto raso)

Single crochet Medio punto

Half-double cro. Punto media vareta

Double crochet Punto vareta

Triple crochet Punto vareta doble

 

But there's at least one multi-lingual stitch list which shows very different names in Spanish for slip stitch, single (sc), half-double (hdc), double (dc), and triple (tr) crochet. It gives punto deslizado, macizo doble, [no term for hdc], macizo triple, and macizo cuadruple, respectively, for these terms, agreeing only with "punto cadena" for chain stitch.

 

Here is my point (I know; at last! :lol ):

 

Is it possible that, somewhere along the line, one of these terms for single crochet (Brit. "double crochet," Span. "medio punto" or "macizo doble") became confused? The Spanish term "medio punto" would be particularly easy to do this with, since "medio" usually means "half," like the median strip that goes down the halfway point of a street.

 

This is a terrific puzzle, but is it possible for you to get a photocopy of the publisher's page so that we (or at least you) can find out what country the book/pattern was printed in? I think that would be the biggest help in figuring out what is meant by "half single crochet."

 

DCM

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Couldn't it just be a stitch used by that designer for that certain pattern? Iv'e seen some different patterns that use the designers own interpretation of the stitches they use.

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Don't we have any UK members who can give us a version of what they think? I sure wish I knew what pattern it was and where it came from (book, internet or what?).

 

I searched on the internet through some UK web sites and they said that the U.S. sl st was the same as the U.K. sl st. No wonder newbies get confused, if us old timers can't get it straight. :think:lol

Edited by HappyOldCro
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I've crocheted over 30 years and I've never seen or heard of a half single crochet stitch, not even from my mother or grandmother.

 

The closest I can even think of anyone saying that, might be to say "crochet into half the single crochet stitch," then explain further that it means to go into the front (or back) of the stitch only.

 

I can't think of any other reason.

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A half single crochet is a slip stitch. It might be a regional thing... I live in California and that's how my mom taught it to me, but I don't know if she learned that term here, or if she learned it growing up in Nebraska.

might i chime in, being from nebraska, I never heard of it either, good luck though, hope you all can slueth this out for us!

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:thinkSorry but I think Heart has it a little backwards.

UK patterns do not have a SC, it is a DC for us but I will agree with others, the HSC will need to be a SL ST because that is the only thing you can do that is smaller than a SC.

Maybe you can tell us where the HSC is used.

That may help make it clearer as to what you really need to do.

Have fun.

Colleen:hug

PS, For those who need an accurate list of the differences between US & UK, here they are from the horses mouth. Well, I have been using UK patterns for more than 50 years, crocheting for more than 60 but using patterns for about 50.

US: UK:

SL ST = Slip Stitch. SL ST = Slip Stitch.

SC = Single Crochet. DC = Double Crochet.

DC = Double Crochet. TR = Treble.

HDC = Half Double Crochet HTR = Half Treble

TR = Treble. DTR = Double Treble.

DTR = Double Treble. TR TR = Triple Treble

Each stitch gets longer by 1YO and takes one more movement to complete except the HDC.

I have placed the comparison on the same line.

Hope this helps.

Edited by Aggie May
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Ive been croching for alot of years, I would think it would be a hdc , but it could also be mistake typo. most patterns explain how to do the stitches.

The more I look at the UK and US. It confuses me.

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Hi everyone,

 

I can sort this out as I believe I am the creator of the half single crochet everyone is discussing. It is used in 4 of my patterns. The braided knit look headband, twirlagig flower large and small, and the twirlagig hat.

 

On Ravelry:

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/braided-twirlagig-hat

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/braided-a-knit-look-headband

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/braided-twirlagig-flower

 

On Annies Attic:

http://www.anniesattic.com/electronic_downloads/detail.html?prod_id=84893&cat_id=978

http://www.anniesattic.com/electronic_downloads/detail.html?prod_id=84924&cat_id=978

 

 

The stitch is not a slip stitch. In 35 years of crocheting I have not seen the particular stitch of half single crochet used elsewhere. I also created a half triple and a half double triple to create my patterns and the raised braid effect.

 

I list my direct email on patterns purchased through Ravelry.com or through my etsy shop as I offer full pattern support and help with my patterns. However, my listings through Annies Attic they would not allow me to do so. They want you to contact them directly for any pattern help. For what they can not help with, they will put you in contact with the designer. My direct email is thehookhound@yahoo.com for any pattern help.

 

I would also like to remind that my patterns whether purchased through Annies Attic, my Ravelry shop, or Etsy shop are protected by copyright. I would appreciate if copies were not made and passed around if the pattern in question on the first post of the thread is indeed one of mine. Even though my patterns are for sale with Annies Attic I have retained full copyright.

 

Crazycrochet if you could pass along my email to your cousins friend I would appreciate. Also, do you have the name of the pattern in question? I can help her with the stitch and provide her with a private video link on how to do the stitch if it is one of mine.

 

 

Thank you,

Carlinda Lewis.

Edited by Carlinda
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I have a hand written pattern from a friend that has a 1/2 sc used to join a chain to start a circle where I usually see a join with a slip stitch. It also uses a 1/2 sc later to join the last sc on the round to the first sc, again where I usually see a slip stitch. The last place it appears is in the making of the tie strings: ch 90; turn; 1/2 sc along one edge to the beginning.

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