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Knooking increases

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Can anyone help me by telling how to increase at the end of a row with Knooking? I am trying to knook a knit pattern and now I am stuck.

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My guess is that when you get to the end of your row and want to increase you cast onto your hook the number of stitches you want to increase by.

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I'd find a pic of a knit increase and try to replicate it. Maybe a little hard to do depending on your experience with knitting but it could work.

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Go to knittinghelp.com. She has great videos. There's more than 1 way to do a knit increase. Look at "Make one (right or left)"

 

I am not sure of the difference here. I did see some instructional videos online but I am at work and I can't get sounds to work at home.

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Do you want to do an increase after all your sts have been worked? Or in between sts? I have found that m1 works nice without a hole in your work. You can also k into your next st, then k into the st immediately below the next st, kind of like putting 2 crochet sts into one st.

 

For increases at the very end, you will need to cast on however many additional sts you need.

Hope this helps!

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When i knit I increase by working a stitch in both back and front loop.

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okay but how exactly would I do that if I am doing this with a crochet hook?

 

You can do this when your patterns calls for a k2 in same st increase: Do your 1st st where you normally would do it, THEN, right after your st, between the st you just made and the next one on your cable, there is a vertical "bar" that is part of the st below the row you are working, just k into that for your increase. This is what some people have done and it seems to work well.

Are you on ravelry? There is a knooking group there and some really good pics/tuts posted about different st techniques. I highly recommend joining. :) OH! There is also a yahoo group that has been around for a very long time, if you do a search in yahoo groups for it, it should pop up, so there should be lots of people there that can be of great help.

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Can anyone help me by telling how to increase at the end of a row with Knooking? I am trying to knook a knit pattern and now I am stuck.

 

First its important to know what increase the pattern that you are using tells you to use. Does it just say "increase a stitch at the end of the row" or does it give a specific stitch in the instructions/stitches?

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You can "knit" into the front and back of the last loop/stitch, or pull up a loop from the bar between the sts (from the previous row). The increase that I find to be the most visually appealing for most things (I do mostly lace knitting which opens up the knitting a lot and makes things more obvious), is to pull a loop up from the back side of the stitch below the last one worked. That would mean that you would work the purl bump on the backside of the stitch you would normally be working, so pull up a loop/knit, and then go back and pull up a loop again (sometimes you can do it on the return row, but all the ways get complicated and keeping track also). The first two techniques tend to leave a hole or gap, and knitting into the front and back of the loop/stitch is a common increase, but will leave a purl bump on the right side. If it is on an edge it won't be seen when seamed or picked up from, most likely.

 

HTH,

Susan Reishus

Edited by elationrelation

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