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Hole when joining rounds

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Hi Everyone! I am so happy to find this forum. I have already learned so much. I am new to crochet and know the basics, but one thing that is bugging the heck out of me is the hole, or space, that is left when I slip stitch at the end of a round. I am working with the magic ring and I love it (no more hole in the middle) but these spaces on the side are ruining the look of my project!

 

Am I doing something wrong or is there a way to prevent this?

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Hi and welcome to the Ville:hook

 

are you doing a dc sttich where you ch3 at the beginning of the round and then slip stitching into the top of the chain3? in that case sometimes the ch3 creates a hole. one solution is the no chain method http://www.youtube.com/user/TXCr1cket

 

or, give us some more info about the exact situation you have w/ the join, for other ideas:)

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I am having trouble with this too. If I do the "no chain" method, does that still count as the "first dc" or not? Where do I put the next dc if I am just continuing the round and where do I put the next dc if I need to increase?

 

To me, this is the most confusing part of doing rounds and probably the reason I hesitate to do patterns that use them.

 

Can we get more help/suggestions/tutorials please????

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I am having trouble with this too. If I do the "no chain" method, does that still count as the "first dc" or not? Where do I put the next dc if I am just continuing the round and where do I put the next dc if I need to increase?

 

 

if you do the no-chain method in the video by Txcr1cket, you are actually making a dc stitch, so yes it counts as the first stitch. Where you put the next stitch really depends on exactly what you are working on. if the pattern says to dc in every stitch, then the 2nd dc will go into the top of the next stitch in the row below. where you place your increases also depends on what you are making as well.

 

is there a specific pattern you'd like help with?

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if you do the no-chain method in the video by Txcr1cket, you are actually making a dc stitch, so yes it counts as the first stitch. Where you put the next stitch really depends on exactly what you are working on. if the pattern says to dc in every stitch, then the 2nd dc will go into the top of the next stitch in the row below. where you place your increases also depends on what you are making as well.

 

is there a specific pattern you'd like help with?

 

I am trying to make a crochet bag dispenser. It says to CH3 at the beginning of each round but does not state if that is counted as the first DC or not.

 

I am finding crocheting in the round to be very difficult. Is it just me? There are so many awesome patterns of things I would love to make but this isn't worth it if my stuff comes out looking bad. :angry

 

Thanks

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usually the ch 3 does count as the first dc.

 

can you tell us where to find the pattern so we can help interpret it?

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sometimes what i do at the beg of a rnd to prevent a hole is instead of chaining 3 for the 1st dc, i will "sc, ch2" (i also do this at the beginning of rows going back and forth). the the ch 3, it can be a slight diff size than a reg stitch or can be a bit flimsy so pulls away and makes the hole.

 

another solution that i have read about is to change it from do a ch3 as the 1st dc, to change it to "ch2 (this raises your needle up a slight bit but does not count in the stitch count) and then do the first dc. the ch 2 is like a "cushion" in the space so fills it to keep it from being there (clear as mud?)

 

sandy

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yeah, that pattern does not make it clear about the treatment of the ch3 on subsequent rounds. if you sl st into the top of the initial ch3, then ch 3 again, then make your dc into the dc on row below, you should have a line of ch3 that is pretty continuous, like a seam up the side of the piece. the no-chain dc in the video would also work instead of the ch 3.

 

I would say that if on each round you have the same number of stitches then it will be fine. this seems to be an article where the appearance is not crucial.

 

Like Sandy said, lots of us have worked out our own ways of handling the first stitch of a new row. Everybody is a little different, so what works for one may not work for all. and i find i use different methods based on the yarn and sttich pattern.

 

 

re the pattern--You may have better luck if you look for patterns in books, magazines, or from yarn companies. Sometimes patterns on blogs are written in very non-standard ways and are more confusing. (of course some published patterns are as well)

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Ok, so when I come to the sl st at the end, my next stitch to start the round would be the no-chain dc (that's what I prefer) and then do I go to the next stitch and do my dc or do I need to dc into the same stitch as the no-chain?

 

That's what confuses me on rounds. When do you dc into the same chain and when do you go to the next one.

 

I worked on it tonight and the seam is not straight - it is shifting. I know looks don't matter on this project (atleast not this particular one cause I am keeping it) but I would like to give them as gifts and I won't be able to if they look like this.

 

Is it natural to find rounds so confusing? I want to make amigurumi things but until I conquer crocheting in the round, I don't dare try.

 

I really appreciate your help.

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Ok, so when I come to the sl st at the end, my next stitch to start the round would be the no-chain dc (that's what I prefer) and then do I go to the next stitch and do my dc or do I need to dc into the same stitch as the no-chain?

 

That's what confuses me on rounds. When do you dc into the same chain and when do you go to the next one.

 

I worked on it tonight and the seam is not straight - it is shifting. I know looks don't matter on this project (atleast not this particular one cause I am keeping it) but I would like to give them as gifts and I won't be able to if they look like this.

 

Is it natural to find rounds so confusing? I want to make amigurumi things but until I conquer crocheting in the round, I don't dare try.

 

I really appreciate your help.

 

 

This might help.

http://www.hook-and-hype.de/?lp_lang_pref=en&page_id=100

 

Don't let this intimidate you. You might do just fine at amigurimi since most of those patterns continue around in a spiral and you have to use a stitch marker to keep track of your rounds.

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here is a video on how to crochet a tube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqWR0TPbvgk

Teresa has some very good videos, there is also one on making an amigurumi tube I think.

 

one reason your seam is shifting is that crochet stitches do not stack on top of each other exactly, they are just a bit offset. even when we sttich into the correct stitch, we can still have a shifting seam. to counteract this, you can turn the work at the end of each round, which will even out the offsets.

 

if you use the no-chain row start, do not make a second dc st into that first st. if you make another st there, you will be increasing by one sttich.

 

here is a quick overview of when the turning chain does and does not count as the first stitch http://cache.lionbrand.com/faq/111.html Really, i think the important thing is to be consistent throughout your piece--work each row the same way so it will look the same---and to keep your sttich count correct. As long as you do those 2 things you should be fine.

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Thank you all for the suggestions and the links. I love Teresa's videos and have learned a lot from them. That is how I learn best - by seeing what is being done.

 

I tore out what I had done and am going to try it again using a few different techniques.

 

You guys are awesome....

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you're welcome :hook

that should be a good project to practice on :)

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I'm looking for a page that is dedicated to an alternaitve join when working in the round. I've looked through the posts on this topic, and it is not listed. The only thing I can tell you about it is it was presented in photos, not video.

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I'm looking for a page that is dedicated to an alternaitve join when working in the round. I've looked through the posts on this topic, and it is not listed. The only thing I can tell you about it is it was presented in photos, not video.

 

Is this what you were looking for? http://sarahlondon.wordpress.com/2009/08/10/seamless-symmetrical/

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Hi and welcome to the Ville:hook

 

are you doing a dc sttich where you ch3 at the beginning of the round and then slip stitching into the top of the chain3? in that case sometimes the ch3 creates a hole. one solution is the no chain method http://www.youtube.com/user/TXCr1cket

 

or, give us some more info about the exact situation you have w/ the join, for other ideas:)

 

Thanks for the link...I've never seen that before!

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Thanks for the link...I've never seen that before!

 

you're welcome, Heather! it is pretty handy:hook

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Crocheting in the round isn't really difficult; it just takes practice. Don't be intiidated by it. It confuses us all at first.

 

Jean Leinhauser

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I use the invisible join, Ill locate the link for you, one second.....here ya go,

 

http://sarahlondon.wordpress.com/2009/08/10/seamless-symmetrical/

 

I am wondering though, as some of the comments asked, what do you do if you want to keep the same color for every row? It would get a little tedious and time consuming to have to cut the yarn after every row plus, I hate weaving in the ends!! Has anyone found a way to do this without cutting the yarn each time?

 

Thank you for the link...you all are a wealth of knowledge and I appreciate all the help.

Edited by kathypinaz

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