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Katrala

Help with starting edge - it seems too tight!

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I'm very new to crochet and a problem that I'm having is that my starting edge seems to be very tight compared to the rest of my work, so it makes everything look curled.

 

Is this typical for crochet and something that can be solved with blocking?

 

Is my chain too tight at the beginning or the rest of my crochet too loose?

 

I've tried to loosen up my chain, but when I do it seems to just go all over the place and doesn't look like pictures that I see.

 

The bottom / starting row (sorry, I'm very used to knitting terms) feels very tight in comparison with the rest of the piece.

 

Below is an example of a scarf I was attempting to make. I can force it to be completely straight, but as soon as it is moved it starts to go in that arc again.

 

Thank you in advance for any advice.

 

IMG00309-20100110-0855.jpg

post-35236-135897494672_thumb.jpg

Edited by Katrala

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As long as I have crocheted, I still up the size of my hook in my starting chain. If I am going to use a H hook for the project, I chain with an I. If it is still too tight, try the next size up. :)

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Try using a bigger hook (I use 2 sizes larger) for the starting chain. If it calls for an H I use a J for the starting chain. That used to happen to me all the time with afghans, but using the bigger hook to start really helped. Good Luck!!

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I use the hook I'm using throughout the project, I just make my ch with a very relaxed hand. I also start my first row into the back "bump" or "butt" of the chain. Not the "V" part.

Most important though, is to just practice.......your tension will eventually even out as you get more accustomed to crochet. My grandmother taught me to crochet, and she made me ch FOREVER before she would teach me an actual st. Sometimes she would be (well, I thought anyways) mean about it by ripping out my ch and saying "good job! now, do it again!" :(

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I recommend using a hook 1 or 2 sizes larger for the starting chain. the chain itself may not look great, but in most cases it won't be very visible anyway.

 

there is also a way to start without making a chain at all, which is called foundation single crochet (or foundation double crochet). http://snuffykin.livejournal.com/43642.html

http://www.thecrochetside.com/video-tutorials/single-crochet-base-chain/

http://crochet-mania.blogspot.com/2008/11/chain-foundation-crochet-tip-30.html (click on the links for video)

this may seem overly complicated, but you can file it away for future reference. It is a wonderful method for making a foundation row that is stretchy and supple like the rest of the crocheted piece.

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I use the hook I'm using throughout the project, I just make my ch with a very relaxed hand. I also start my first row into the back "bump" or "butt" of the chain. Not the "V" part.

 

I use one size larger hook for the chain, and then start my first row in the back bump too - your first edge will then look just like your last row.

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I either use the foundation method or I use a hook 1 or 2 sizes larger. I tend to crochet very tightly at times soI have to force myself to pay attention to my work or use a bigger hook. Time and practice will tell you what works best for you.

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I also start my first row into the back "bump" or "butt" of the chain. Not the "V" part.

 

What part of the chain do you mean?

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I usually go up a hook size and work into the back of the chain.

 

It looks to me like your problem is more of a tension issue. The size of the loop on the hook that you're going to pull thru should be the same size as the shaft of the hook. It looks like you're pulling the loop too tight as you're sliding it off.

 

I think we all have that problem when we're first starting out. It comes with practice. When I teach my daughter's friends I have them do feet upon feet of chains. I had one girl make all the garland for her tree one year.

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Thanks so much for all the replies!

 

I started on something like night and figured out what the "back" of the chain was (thanks to that link!)

 

The edge does look nicer that way and combining that with a larger hook has already helped a lot!

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