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Found 23 results

  1. Hello 👋🏼 all, I'm a mess! I am never good at finishing projects. I am an abandoned wife (after 38½ years - he filed for divorce the day after our 39th anniversary), so struggling with depression. He was my soulmate, my best friend, my everything, and he stole all that from me, chucked it in the dumpster, set fire to it, and walked away. So if I suddenly get all weird when any touchy subject comes up, think nothing of it. I am 55 years old, nearly 56. I spent 2½ decades as a semi trailer mechanic, before a fall on ice and snow ruined my life. From that point on, apparently I was getting to be too much of an inconvenience, and when I had shoulder surgery that I had trouble recovering from, and then got pneumonia so bad I had to be hospitalized, well... I got really inconvenient. I had barely gotten home from the hospital before he packed his things and left. I was too much of an inconvenience to him. He had just retired (30 years & out early retirement) and had discovered his retirement wasn't what he had dreamed of it being. So, I guess he blamed it on me. He told me he didn't "want to live in my world any more," whatever the ~bleeping bleep~ that's supposed to be. And it's been 16 months, but I still hurt as much as the day he left, and I've never found out when it changed from OUR world to just mine, either. Okay, that's the bad. The good? I have 2 adult sons that are disabled, but both with me and caring and gentlemanly and helpful and all the positives. They're what their dad was before he... lost his marbles, or had his midlife crisis, or whatever this is. The oldest is a pain, as he has the worst kind of bipolar disorder, but he loves me. The younger has fibromyalgia and spinal stenosis, which cause him a.lot of pain, but he keeps going, and tries his best. He can't work, because who wants an employee who randomly will have a fatigue day when they can barely even get out of bed. He hasn't gotten disability, yet, because the US government are bellends, top lefts, whatever you want to call them, where they can't give people what they need. I had to wait 4 years, myself, fighting again and again to get my own disability! So, the younger one doesn't have disability, the oldest has the lowest amount of disability payment each month because he's always had it, since he was (IIRC) 7 years old, and I have disability. With what He Who Shall Not Be Bothered pays on the bills (which ain't much), we haven't starved, yet. What do we do? We like to fish, to camp, we like music of most kinds - I like everything from Mozart and Monteverdi, Handel and Vivaldi, to modern heavy metal (ok, what I learned was heavy metal in 1980 - don't @ me, LOL!) like Five Finger Death Punch, Disturbed, Black Sabbath, Motörhead, Iron Maiden, Slayer, and Pantera, to blues like John Lee Hooker, BB King, Muddy Waters, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Albert King. I like a lot of the stuff in between, in moderation. 😄 My boys like most of what I like, too, though they can't take too much Beethoven and Bach before they get itchy. 😉 I love woodworking, painting (automotive, mural, and just painting wood projects), reusing & repurposing stuff that I want to keep out of the landfill, gardening (nothing tastes better than stuff you grow yourself!), baking, cake decorating (though I don't have as many to bake cakes for, now), and raising my featherbabies - my chickens, guineas, quail, and one grumpy gander. 😀 I want to get turkeys, again, a beautiful breed called Sweetgrass. I had 3 beauties, but they got killed by a predator. 😭 I lost nearly all of my Banty Cochins then, too. I still want to replace them, but am making sure new coops & pens are even more secure than what I thought I had them, before. And, of course, I love to crochet! Otherwise, I wouldn't be here, would I? I have recently learned the Tunisian style, and am doing a 4th Doctor scarf in Tunisian knit stitch. I'm turning an old giant knitted sweater that I got for a single dollar into a reusable bag with a big pocket on each side, and may take apart the rest of it for the yarn out of it. I am getting about 4-5 bucks of yarn out of it, at minimum, plus a big bag! And I have a stitch that my mom taught me back somewhere around the early to mid 1970s that she called a single-and-a-half crochet stitch. It's like nothing else I've seen anywhere. She also taught me a stitch she called a double-and-a-half stitch that I just recently learned is called a half double. But as I hunted and hunted, after that, I found not even a hint of the single-and-a-half stitch! I've seen people say it has to be a slip stitch, but the one she taught me is taller than single, and shorter than a double. Anyway, that's the bad and the good, and I'd say the bad is also the ugly, too. Now, you know me pretty darned good!
  2. This tree skirt made with Tunisian Knit Stitches mainly gives it a beautiful knit look and the pattern is easy to memorize so I didn’t have to look at the instructions while working on it. What makes it even better is that I carried the yarn in the back so I had very few ends to weave in! This pattern is fully customizable too, you can make it in any size depending on what the size of your tree is. I have included a chart in the pattern with the recommended tree skirt size for different tree sizes. Free pattern here - https://knitterknotter.com/easy-christmas-crochet-tree-skirt-free-tunisian-pattern/
  3. This pair of Kritika slippers is super easy to make, all you need is a rectangle! Once you have a rectangle, there is a little bit of shaping needed. It is very easy, I promise! I also added a crocheted button to each slipper and I think it looks really cute! This pattern uses only Tunisian Simple Stitches so it is perfect for beginners!! It is possible to make them with any combination of colors. I changed color after every row but if you’d rather make it with a single color, that would work great too! These slippers are really quick to make since you are only making rows of Tunisian Simple Stitches – no increases or decreases! It comes in 9 sizes so you can make them for yourself and for your little ones! They would make great gifts too!! The free version on my blog is for US Size 8 for Women.
  4. Have you tried making slippers using Tunisian crochet? Because of the nature of the craft, the fabric that is built is very dense and is perfect for making slippers! I started this project as an experiment to try shaping with short rows. It turned into these lovely slippers that I’ve been using to keep my feet warm during chilly spring days! This pattern uses only Tunisian Simple Stitches and takes advantage of short rows to shape the slippers. This is a fairly quick project and, since it comes in 9 sizes, it is a perfect for making a set for yourself and your little ones! At the end of the pattern, I talk about how these slippers can be secured on the tiny feet of toddlers so they don’t come off while they walk! https://knitterknotter.com/ashvini-tunisian-slippers-free-crochet-pattern/
  5. Are you ready to start working on some spring patterns? You can make it with any yarn and stitch combination and all you need to make is a rectangle! https://knitterknotter.com/origami-friendship-bag/
  6. Quick and easy mug cozy pattern for Valentine's Day if Tunisian crochet is on your mind https://knitterknotter.com/easy-tunisian-crochet-mug-cozy-free-pattern/
  7. In about 1978 I made myself a very simple Tunisian crochet cotton jacket. It was a pattern in a magazine...maybe one of those women's magazines, or maybe a crochet magazine? I cut out the pattern and mounted it to a piece of cardboard, but it's been lost over the years. The pattern was really nothing more than several rectangles sewn together; no special joining or fancy stitches. It had one (wooden?) button near the neck to hold it closed. I believe the colors used in the photo were stripes of light blue and beige, although I could be wrong. During my many moves, the jacket itself has disappeared. I've searched everywhere I know for this pattern, so now I'm going to start posting in Forums. (Even Ravelry couldn't help me!) Any hints, or even some commiserating over a lost pattern, would be most welcome! Thanks.
  8. I have been seeing a lot of lovely crocheted pocket shawls lately. I wanted to make one using Tunisian crochet and here it is! https://knitterknotter.com/tunisian-boho-pocket-shawl-free-crochet-pattern/
  9. I have started a guest blogging series on my website where I share patterns from other designers. The first one in the series is a Tunisian Scarf pattern by Richard Gartland. Here is the free pattern: https://knitterknotter.com/zig-zag-tunisian-purl-scarf-free-pattern/
  10. I recently heard about ‘Christmas in July’ and just thinking about the holidays made me very happy! I designed this wine bottle cozy and made a few for gifting at the end of this year! This is an intermediate level Tunisian crochet pattern and comes with two options - one that ends at the neck of the bottle and another that goes all the way to the cap of the bottle and ends with a ruffle.. The only tricky part is to work in a round with such a small circumference. If you know how to make a handful of basic Tunisian stitches and how to work in a round, this should not be too difficult and you will have some very pretty handmade gifts ready in no time! Here's the free pattern: https://knitterknotter.com/a-taste-of-honey-wine-bottle-cozy-free-pattern/
  11. This scarf is made up of a simple lace pattern that makes a beautifully textured and breathable fabric. Since it is made up of bulky weight yarn, it works up quickly too. I made this scarf for my husband but I could wear it too! This is a really fun pattern and can be easily made while relaxing or watching Netflix https://knitterknotter.com/frosty-ridge-scarf-free-pattern/
  12. July 4th is almost here and if you have not made something yet, this bunting is a quick and easy pattern that you will be able to make in no time! This is also perfect to make with kids because who doesn’t love tassels!? https://knitterknotter.com/patriotic-july-4th-tunisian-bunting-free-pattern/
  13. ETSY shop downloadable ad free pdf- https://www.etsy.com/in-en/shop/LetsAllCrochet?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=803367213
  14. A mask mate or an ear saver is an accessory that can be used with a face mask to prevent sore ears. Prolonged use of a face mask with elastic bands that go over the ears can make the ears very sore. There are a lot of health care workers who could benefit from using these mask mates because they have to wear such masks on a daily basis for long hours. These mask mates are made up of 100% cotton and are washable. They require a small amount of yarn and 2 buttons and are really quick to make! 1. They prevent ears from getting sore because of prolonged use of masks.2. They help people with small heads because the mask fits better with them.3. They are made of cotton so they can be washed in hot water and disinfected.4. They need a tiny amount of yarn so they can be made out of scraps.5. If you haven’t tried Tunisian crochet, this is a great pattern for beginners The free pattern is available on my blog - you can find links for downloading the free PDF here too: https://knitterknotter.com/tunisian-mask-mates-ear-savers-free-pattern/
  15. If you are looking for a new pattern to work on while you stay at home, here is something you might be interested in: https://knitterknotter.com/luxury-plaid-tunisian-poncho-free-pattern/ Plaid was a favorite this winter and I wanted to make something for myself. I decided to make this poncho because I was pregnant and this was something I could wear even after the baby was born! The poncho is made with the entrelac technique and is really easy to make. I have photo and video tutorials to follow along that cover all the basics of making this poncho along with some tips - including how you can carry yarn for the diagonals that have blocks of alternating colors so you won’t have a million ends to weave in! In the end, I added a faux fur trim to give it a luxurious feel and look. The pattern consists of a chart, and a photo tutorial. Since the pattern works up slightly differently for left and right handed people, you will receive two sets of PDF documents - one set with left handed instructions and the other with right handed instructions.
  16. Have you wanted to try Tunisian crochet but did not because they require a whole set of new hooks?The Join Me - Easy Tunisian Mittens can be made with a regular hook and are super easy to make. Each mitten is worked in panels that are joined using the ‘Join as you go’ technique. Free pattern: https://knitterknotter.com/join-me-easy-tunisian-mittens-free-pattern/
  17. This poncho is made up of three rectangles so you don’t have to deal with any increases / decreases. It only requires basic knowledge of Tunisian crochet since it is made up of just two stitches - Tunisian Simple Stitch and Tunisian Purl Stitch. It is made using bulky weight yarn so it works up really quickly too! If you are interested in making something simple yet fun with Tunisian crochet, this will be perfect! https://knitterknotter.com/sparsh-poncho-free-pattern/
  18. I am happy to introduce my latest free pattern - A Taste of Honey Shawl!! I made this triangle shawl because when I learnt the Tunisian Honeycomb Stitch, I couldn't stop thinking of it https://knitterknotter.com/a-taste-of-honey-shawl-free-pattern/ This is a beginner friendly pattern, totally netflixable because you don't have to remember counts and it is a one line repeat! I also have a video tutorial that you can use to follow along and make the shawl with me: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnNoasT8F8LN6qNvr6mad4A
  19. I recently made a graphgan using Tunisian crochet but the amount of vertical distortion present was not appealing for me. I dont have this issue when doing sc crochet graphgans. I tried to do numerous swatches with a bunch of different tensions (tight, loose, super tight, etc) but they all came out closer to rectangles when the stitch count was a 10x10 square. The photo I attached was a 34x36 graph and while I still think it looks good, I would really prefer to avoid this amount of distortion for other graphs. Does anyone have any tips or links to blogs/videos that could help explain what I'm doing wrong?
  20. https://knitterknotter.com/turquoise-fiesta-shawl-free-pattern/
  21. Hello! I posted this under Tunisian Crochet, but as the last post in this section was from April and I'm new to crochet forums, I'm not sure if this was in the right place--I'm reposting this here because I desperately need help! I'm trying to crochet my first pair of gloves (I asked my boyfriend what he'd want me to make him for Christmas and he, of course, chose the hardest thing possible). I found this pattern that I love, and so far it's gone well; I've reached the part where I'm supposed to chain a new section to begin making the thumb. This is where I get tripped up, though! The pattern states, "Ch 9 loosely, draw up a loop in 2nd st from hook and in each st of ch; 8 loops, work pat. until there are 22 loops on hook; work off loops. Work on these 22 sts for 2½ ins." My first issue is that when I "draw up a loop" in every stitch of the chain I end up with 9 loops on my hook, not 8. Not a big deal, I figured that's such a small difference I can work with it, it'd be fine. But with the next part, I literally have no idea what it means. How do I get 22 loops out of 8 (or 9)? Am I supposed to draw these off of the hook first, and then increase in that new section until I have 22 loops? It states that I'm supposed to work on these 22 stitches, so obviously that number is important, but it doesn't give me any instruction as to how to do that. My first instinct was to work the loops off of the crochet hook before increasing, but if I do that it makes a foundation that is significantly smaller than what 22 stitches from the get-go would give me. Why wouldn't I just chain 22 or 23 to start? I've looked online to no avail, and there's no way to contact the creator of the pattern that I can find. You can view the full pattern here Men's Afghan Stitch Gloves Pattern. (I figured once I started that "Afghan Stitch" is either another name or a type of Tunisian crochet; correct me if I'm wrong! Also, it might just be me, but the way this pattern is written gives me a headache--it's just the best I could find without having to knit with a set of double pointed knitting needles, and that seemed harder than figuring this type of pattern out). I'm bolding my two questions just because I know I've written a lot, so hopefully it's easier to read. I'm also adding a series of photos to show how I'm interpreting the first portion of the instructions for the thumb. I feel like I don't even know enough to try and guess around until I figure something out! This is my first time working with this type of stitch, and I've loved working in it so far--if I can just figure out what they mean by this one part, I think I should be able to finish this pattern and make a beautiful pair of gloves. Thank you!
  22. Hello! I'm trying to crochet my first pair of gloves (I asked my boyfriend what he'd want me to make him for Christmas and he, of course, chose the hardest thing possible). I found this pattern that I love, and so far it's gone well; I've reached the part where I'm supposed to chain a new section to begin making the thumb. This is where I get tripped up, though! The pattern states, "Ch 9 loosely, draw up a loop in 2nd st from hook and in each st of ch; 8 loops, work pat. until there are 22 loops on hook; work off loops. Work on these 22 sts for 2½ ins." My first issue is that when I "draw up a loop" in every stitch of the chain I end up with 9 loops on my hook, not 8. Not a big deal, I figured that's such a small difference I can work with it, it'd be fine. But with the next part, I literally have no idea what it means. How do I get 22 loops out of 8 (or 9)? Am I supposed to draw these off of the hook first, and then increase in that new section until I have 22 loops? It states that I'm supposed to work on these 22 stitches, so obviously that number is important, but it doesn't give me any instruction as to how to do that. My first instinct was to work the loops off of the crochet hook before increasing, but if I do that it makes a foundation that is significantly smaller than what 22 stitches from the get-go would give me. Why wouldn't I just chain 22 or 23 to start? I've looked online to no avail, and there's no way to contact the creator of the pattern that I can find. You can view the full pattern here Men's Afghan Stitch Gloves Pattern. (I figured once I started that "Afghan Stitch" is either another name or a type of Tunisian crochet; correct me if I'm wrong! Also, it might just be me, but the way this pattern is written gives me a headache--it's just the best I could find without having to knit with a set of double pointed knitting needles, and that seemed harder than figuring this type of pattern out). I'm bolding my two questions just because I know I've written a lot, so hopefully it's easier to read. I'm also adding a series of photos to show how I'm interpreting the first portion of the instructions for the thumb. I feel like I don't even know enough to try and guess around until I figure something out! This is my first time working with this type of stitch, and I've loved working in it so far--if I can just figure out what they mean by this one part, I think I should be able to finish this pattern and make a beautiful pair of gloves. Thank you!
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