Jump to content

Nhewyt

Villager
  • Content Count

    54
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Nhewyt

  • Rank
    Villager
  • Birthday 01/11/1964

A Few Things About Me

  • Location
    near Pittsburgh, PA
  1. Welcome to Crochetville from hot and HUMID Pennsylvania. I totally understand about the "making it up" - I have no problem following patterns but more often than not, as I'm working a pattern I say to myself "it will look better if I do it this way" and change it as I go along.
  2. Welcome and congrats on your up coming bundle of joy. It will be a truely wonderful thing to be able to wrap your new born in a blanket that you made yourself with love!
  3. Nhewyt

    hello

    Welcome to you and blessings, hope and love to your mother in law for a total remission this time. It is wonderful of you to be sending her a shawl.
  4. Welcome to the gang Now don't give up on going to the fabric section - especially the cheapies table - there are a lot of fabrics you can cut on the bias into strips, join through little slits at either end, and crochet into wonderful rugs, purses, baskets, etc.
  5. Humm, no, I don't think having a huge stash is a "must do" if you are a crocheter. I agree with what was said about being taught in our youth to be a certain kind of shopper. If it is a fantastic deal and I can afford it, I usually can't pass it up. But after my mom and sister moved a few years ago, and I saw how attached they were to really stupid things, how they could not bear to let anything go (and I do mean ANYTHING) it made me take a hard look at myself and I realized how bad I'd gotten. I vowed to change then and there. That was over 10 years ago. I did change a LOT of things - now, every three months I go through the whole house and throw out or give away things that were not used the past three months and will not likely be used in the upcoming three months. My only "indulgence" is my fiber/crafting stash which includes yarn, roving, raw fleece, feathers, beads, paper, paints, pens, colored pencils and a small amount of fabric. My reasoning is that I need to allow myself at least one indulgence AND the fact that a large portion of the fiber related items I make end up going to charities, so my indulgence isn't just a selfish/nuerotic compulsion - it actually does some good. But yes - too much hording is not really a necessity, and if you let it control you instead of controlling it, sometimes it can become a problem.
  6. No worries dear - after I saw the other posts I figured it was something like that right away - and the fact that no-one in this thread yelled at you goes to show we all pretty much figured something along those lines. I'm glad your back - would be a shame to miss out on all this board has to offer just cause a friend thought they were being funny.
  7. Actually, I learned to do it this way - Row 1: chain as many as wanted, then sc across, ch 1 and turn Row 2: (the hardest row) work through the other loop of the foundation chain and the FRONT loop of the working row - in other words, up under the other loop of the foundation chain, under the front loop of the working stitch, yo, and complete a sc - across, ch 1 and turn Row 3: (easy from here on out) go up under the un-used loop from the previous row (it will stick out like a ridge and be easy to see), under the FRONT loop of the working row stitch, yo, complete sc - across, ch 1 turn Repeat row 3 until desired length. Basically, I learned it the opposite of what the potholder stitch is.
  8. All right, I couldn't wait, so I tried it. Yes, it does work, but it's a bit of a pain in the butt to do. The first round has to be regular sc, the second round you work in the front loops without turning (just as you would continue working in the round normally) but you have to work right up to the first sc, join and then turn the work. It's a little tricky the first round to see where the un-used loops are, but it can be done. I fiddled with it for a few rounds, it looks ok, but in the end I think it's just too much of a hassle - I like fast and easy when it comes to chair pads and hot pads =('o')=
  9. Actually, if you check her past posts, it just seems that today she isn't herself - two nasty posts within minutes of each other - both related to money in some way. So maybe she's just had some bad news today and is feeling grouchy - or, she has friends over and one of the friends kids is playing on the computer with her log on and just being a jerk. I say we give her the benefit of the doubt, because most of her previous postings were "normal" and even joking about this addiction called crochet.
  10. Rachel, we all have and need indugences - it's part of being human. I'm sure you have at least one and hopefully it's nothing so hideous and harmful as the hording of yarn.
  11. OK, this is probably just another one of my "wild hairs" ideas, and if no one else has tried it or knows of it being done, I guess I'll have to have a go, but, I figured I'd ask first... ...so...has anyone tried doing the waffle weave stitch in the round? I was thinking it would make for some really cushiony chair pads and if done in cotton some really neat hot pads.
  12. Oh my gosh, that little black cat is a SCREAM - he is so funny! Great job on your crocheting and Kristie's design work!
  13. Amazing job - and she's only ten? I do believe we have a future crochet designer here
  14. I think the colors work great together for a tiger look and the spike stitches really give the impression of tiger stripes. Great job!
  15. Well gosh, with a winning smile like that I bet she could get you to work with that puffy yarn again Both projects are very lovely and perfectly suited for your DD - thanks for sharing.
×
×
  • Create New...