redrosesdz

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About redrosesdz

  • Rank
    Junior Villager
  • Birthday 12/27/1961

Converted

  • Real Name
    Sharon
  • Biography
    I have 2 sons and 1 granddaughter and 2 grandsons.
  • Location
    Pennsylvania
  • Favorite things to crochet
    Anything new

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  1. Wow, Sarisue! I am super impressed! If that is it, it has the instruction as the OP wrote for the hind legs... Rnd 1: 12 sc in a magic ring, join 9 sc, 3 sc are for the toes. The pic shows the join to the 4th sc. 3 sc stick out and are unworked. Just like Granny Square said.
  2. That's quite an under-the-sea family! They're all adorable.
  3. Welcome to Crochetville! There's a woman at ravelry, Nancy Liggins, that will graph any popcorn stitch word pattern for $5.
  4. Awww! He's cute and goes well with Thistle.
  5. OMG! He looks just like Tigger. You did a FANTASTIC job on him. He's cute, huggable, and everyone is going to want one. WTG, grandma!
  6. Welcome to Crochetville! How experienced are you as a crocheter (beginner, easy, intermediate, or difficult patterns)? I consider myself an intermediate crocheter. If I do an easy afghan throw and spend 5 or more hours every day on it, I can complete it in about 1.5-2 weeks. Some people crochet faster and some slower than me. I think my speed is about average. The reason that I say this is because you said "about to arrive" and you want to gift it to her while she's here. How long until she actually arrives, assuming you want it done by then? Your experience level and time frame are important in picking a pattern, whether you decide on a throw or a scarf or a kitchen accessory (potholder, dishcloth, cup cozy.) Do not try for a blanket larger than a throw, if your time frame is short. Good luck!
  7. What's the brand and name of the yarn?
  8. Hi AbbyRoseLou, You're looking for buying advice on a finished product. This discussion is about crocheting a product out of yarn or thread. Do you crochet? We can give you our thoughts on yarn/thread manufacturers, fibers, textures, etc. Also, this discussion is from 2009.
  9. ^GS made some great points that I didn't even consider. Normally, if it says join at the end of a round, it's to close the circle by joining to the first stitch and any other verbiage is stitch counts. However, it may be a join to the 4th stitch, which would make the circle fold and 3 stitches stick out. Did you type it exactly as it is written ... without any punctuation between the word "join" and the 9 sc? It's very poorly written. If round 1 is that poorly written, read through the rest of the pattern. It may be difficult (close to impossible) to follow. Note to self: Stop answering forum posts in the middle of the night! smh
  10. Welcome to Crochetville! The sizing is relative. If you take a pattern and use thicker yarn and a larger hook, you get the pattern only larger. If you take a pattern and use thinner yarn and a smaller hook, you get the pattern only smaller. The doily pattern will include the recommended thread and hook size. It should give you the final diameter, too. You should be able to use that information to calculate what you need to make it large enough for a rug. http://arrowsflight.com/doily2rug.html z If math is not your strong suit, make the doily first (or at least the middle 4-5" diameter of it.) Then try the same pattern with a single strand of worsted, bulky or super bulky yarn or try it with a double or triple stands of worsted. Use a K or L hook for a medium rug. Use a P, N or M hook for a large rug. Seeing the size difference should give you an idea of what the final size difference will be. Throw rugs don't have to be an exact size. Plant fiber, like cotton or hemp, or a strong fiber, like nylon or t-shirt yarn, make the best rugs. If you're putting the rug on carpet, then no worries. If you're putting the rug on a hard floor, then test it for being slippery. There are some products out there to add to the back for turning it into non-slippery.
  11. Adorable! What a great idea to use scaps to make cute fur. @uspolishgirl makes cat toys. I bet this would be great for her.
  12. Welcome to Crochetville! I answered in your help thread.
  13. Welcome to Crochetville! What you have is instructions and the stitch count. Make an adjustable ring. Do 12 sc in the ring. Join with a slip stitch to the first sc. The stitch count is 9 sc + 3 sc for toes. If you're struggling with round 1, I'm guessing that you're new to amigurumi. The pattern looks advanced. It assumes you know to chain 1 before making the 12 sc. I strongly suggest googling amigurumi tips. (Normally I'd give links, but I'm on my phone and I'm not good with it.) Also, Google beginner amigurumi pattern. Use one of those as practice. Let us know how it goes!
  14. Thanks, Kathy! I feel like I should have thought of this technique for seaming, too. I did a MAM that joined the panels with the technique. The joins look great & lay flat. It never occurred to me to use it for seaming!
  15. WOW! That's huge news! I'm pretty sure I went to the people's museum when I was in Vienna as a teenager decades ago. Thousands of people from around the world are going to see your work. That's amazing! Congratulations!