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EdieEckman

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  • Content count

    130
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About EdieEckman

  • Rank
    Villager

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  • Real Name
    Edie Eckman
  • Ravelry ID
    edieeckman
  • Biography
    crochet and knitting designer, author, teacher, technical editor
  • Location
    Virginia
  • Occupation
    crocheting & knitting--seriously!
  • How long have you been crocheting?
    1969
  • Favorite Hook
    Wood
  1. EdieEckman

    Modern Granny Scarf

    Modern Granny Scarf A granny rectangle and color-changing yarn with long color changes are all it takes to create this stunner. Mindless rounds of granny fabric make this the perfect take-along project, even for beginners. If you don’t want to use the yarn pictured, pick your favorite multi-colored yarn, or use those small balls in your stash. It’s easy to customize! Buy now
  2. EdieEckman

    Stacie Stole

    Stacie Stole What a great way to use laceweight yarn! A lovely lightweight shawl in subtle colors. The easy-to-learn crochet stitch makes it a great travel project. The optional beaded edging enhances the drape. You'll want more than one!
  3. EdieEckman

    Easy-to-Wear Cowl

    Easy-to-Wear Cowl What could be better than single crochet and chain stitches arranged in an easy-to- stitch, easy-to wear cowl? Use a beautiful variegated yarn as shown here, or choose a lovely shimmery solid color to match your personal style. If you prefer, stitch additional rows and omit the joining row to create a rectangular scarf or stole.
  4. You've probably seen this AP article about crochet before, but it it tickles me that it's made it to the The Borneo Bulletin (and also the Kahleej Times in the UAE). http://borneobulletin.brunei-online.com.bn/index.php/2013/07/07/passionate-crafters-keep-crochet-alive-thriving/
  5. EdieEckman

    Fall Flowers Cowl

    Fall Flowers Cowl The Fall Flowers Cowl is a two-piece circular scarf that can be worn individually or together. Join-as-you-go techniques mean there is minimal finishing for these versatile accessories. Consider adding motifs to make the pieces different lengths. The sample is shown in a beautiful hand-dyed sock yarn, but the pattern lends itself to a variety of yarn colors and weights. A sport- or worsted-weight yarn will make a cozy warm cowl.
  6. Peppermint Stripes Christmas Stocking Simple crochet seed stitch is transformed into something special with just a change of color. Using nothing but single crochet and chain stitches, even beginning crocheters can create this charing seamless stocking. Use your favorite worsted weight yarn and change up the colors to make stockings for the entire family.
  7. EdieEckman

    Noro Vest

    This season-spanning top is deceptively easy to crochet. Worked side-to-side in one piece, the openwork stitch allows the yarn to go a long way while showing up the colors to perfection. Most importantly, the long color changes in Noro yarn mean there are only a couple of ends to weave in. You can get gauge in either the lighter weight Kureyon Sock, or the slightly heavier weight Silk Garden Sock. Noro Vest
  8. EdieEckman

    Garment shaping without increases or decreases

    There are many ways to create shaping without using sc2tog/2 sc in one st, or other ordinary decreases (which I don't find to be bulky, but that's not your question). I believe Mary Jane Hall uses the height of the stitches--when worked side-to-side, this creates shaping as the sc rows are shorter than the dc rows. You can also create shaping by changing hook size, changing stitch pattern, or by adapting the stitch pattern. For example, if it's a pattern than has a certain number of chains between some sets of stitches, you can dec/inc the number of chains.
  9. EdieEckman

    Bobble Fringe Scarf

    Everyone will want to know how you made this one! This 100% reversible scarf uses a unique and easy construction method to dazzling effect. Long lengths of color in the variegated yarn add to the woven effect. The bobble-ended fringe is created at the same time as the surface embellishment, and is quick and easy to do using basic crochet stitches. Bobble Fringe Scarf
  10. EdieEckman

    Flower Frills Scarf

    It's Claudia Handpaint Linen; similar to Euroflax but in beautiful variegated colors.
  11. EdieEckman

    Cascade of Color Scarf

    Thanks, everybody!
  12. EdieEckman

    Flower Frills Scarf

    This easy-to-wear summer scarf lets you take a bit of spring with you wherever you go. The hand-painted sport-weight linen yarn is comfortable next to the skin, and the frilly pendants enhance the drape and movement of the fabric. Instructions are provided in both chart and text formats. Flower Frills Scarf
  13. EdieEckman

    Cascade of Color Scarf

    A riot of color for your neck! Completely reversible and able to be worn many ways, this easy-to-crochet scarf will be a real showstopper. Use a variegated yarn with long color changes, as shown here, or just three different colors of solid yarn. Once you get the hang of it, it's quick to stitch, and great for gift-giving! Cascade of Color Scarf
  14. EdieEckman

    Making a geometrical tablecloth

    There's absolutely NO reason to sew the motifs together. Ack! Yuck! You have a plan already. Since you know where the various shapes belong, just join-as-you-go on the last round of each shape. When you've finished the shapes, you've finished the tablecloth. (Except for weaving in the ends. Another ack! yuck!) Edie Eckman
  15. EdieEckman

    Shaping armholes?

    The body armhole depends on what kind of sleeves you want. Are you making set-in sleeves, or modified drop shoulder, or angled armholes? (I'm assuming you aren't making a raglan sweater.) If set-in sleeves, you'll need to know your cross-back measurement from shoulder-point to shoulder-point. This will be in the range of 13-17" and will help you figure out how many sts you need to get rid of at each armhole. For example, say your sweater has a 40" total bust measurement, and your cross-back measurement is 15" and you are working your cardigan in pieces (1 back and 2 fronts). That means the back will be 40/2 = 20" across. 20" - 15" = 5" worth of sts to get rid of at the armholes. 5/2 = 2.5" worth of sts to get rid of at EACH armhole. If your gauge is 3 hdc = 1", then you need to get rid of 3 x 2.5 = 7 or 8 sts at each armhole for the back (and the same number on each front piece). You'd do this by doing a straight bit of about 4 sts (slip st over 4 sts, then work to last 4 sts and turn). Then a curved bit made by dec 1 st each side every row or every other row 3-4 times. Then work straight until armhole depth is reached. Of course, now you have a lovely armscye, but you'll have to figure out how to shape the sleeve cap, which is the next challenge. Good luck with your cardigan! Edie Eckman
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