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TaleWeaverLA

Villager
  • Content Count

    155
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About TaleWeaverLA

  • Rank
    Villager
  • Birthday 09/30/1959

A Few Things About Me

  • Real name
    Meg PLATIS
  • Short bio
    49, married
  • Location
    Los Angeles, CA
  • Hobbies
    CROCHET, reading
  • Occupation
    retired teacher
  • Favorite projects
    afghans
  • Crocheting since...
    1963
  1. There's an Irish cabled baby blanket in the Spring 2009 (last year) issue of Interweave Crochet. I'm thinking of tackling it. The pattern is called Solas Caomh (Tender Comfort) and you can see picks on Ravelry.
  2. I love getting your weekly newsletter, but didn't notice these, so thanks for posting them here. Rachel, I have to tell you that you, as a young, hip crocheter (i'm 50) give me hope that knitting won't push out crochet completely. Keep your hook held high! peace, meg
  3. And if you don't have a scale, the self-service one at the Post Office works great!
  4. Well, it looks like my version isn't the real one -- I was sure it was dc, but over on Ravelry there's a long thread where a Swedish member posted a translated pattern that says it's single crochet in BULKY yarn. Just a standard tube; 8 sc in the center to start, increasing evenly every row until you have 60 st, then just working even. The color pattern is color A -- 5 rounds color B -- 2 rounds color C -- 1 round color D -- 4 rounds color A -- 3 rounds color C -- 1 round color B -- 1 round color D -- 4 rounds in the Swedish hat, A = yellow, B = white, C = black, D = blue In my version, I'm working between stitches rather than into them; I'll do one of her's to compare. I'm VERY behind on my Crochet Games challenge now, but it was fun, even though i turned out to be SOOOO wrong!!!
  5. Actually, I think what you are describing is the opposite of adding extra stitches -- that causes a rippling effect (it's how you create ruffles). Your problem sounds like cupping, which has two sources -- dropping stitches/decreasing OR working too tightly. Actually, if your tension is the problem, the samples would still have the problem. Try what Amyjk said first -- count the stitches and be sure you have the same total number at the end of each line -- you may be dropping a stitch at the end of each row by not working into the turning chain. If that doesn't help, switch to a larger hook after you make the chain. (Usually, people have too tight a chain, but yours may be so loose that when you work the stitch pattern, you accidentally pull tighter. All of these are common beginner foibles -- some people never really correct them, they just learn to compensate for their own quirks. Everyone here is very helpful, so you'll probably get more replies. keep working at it ONLY as long as it's fun! peace, meg
  6. I thought all squares were called "grannies." In fact, I thought all "motifs" (squares, hexagons, etc) were called "grannies," so when I saw a call for 7" squares that specified "no grannies," I didn't understand how that was possible. Since I've realized "no grannies" didn't mean "no squares," I've been able to donate about a dozen.
  7. I believe a knitting chart has been posted somewhere online for the American Reindeer hat. I have the Swedish hat worked out (could have had it done yesterday if i hadn't second guessed myself and frogged 3x) and will post a photo with directions Tuesday night. It is very easy with just a little trick. happy viewing, meg
  8. I do worry about crochet sweatshops -- especially when Target sells a dc tote bag for less than what it would cost to purchase the raffia here. Based on the website, Li-Ning is a former Olympic athlete himself, who now supplies Olympic teams worldwide. Thanks for finding the website. The Google translator did a good enough job that I didn't have to ask my Swedish neighbor to translate. Part of the page explained to Swedes why the clothing is appropriate for Vancouver, because these "costumes" were based on "THE CONCEPT OF LAYERING" -- somehow I think the Swedes must know about that (I'll ask my neighbor!). But the funniest part, though, was the assurance that the Olympic athletes and officials would be FULLY equipped with this gear: "The Olympic equipment to Vancouver includes over 60 articles. The only garments that actives and leaders themselves must have with them is underwear."
  9. Depends on how good your team is -- when they are the NBA Champions, it ends in June! The Swedish hats were definitely crocheted -- and I am going to try to duplicate them. If I do manage it, I will post a pic. I rewound frame-by-frame to get a count of the number of rows for each color!
  10. You might also want to try the Go Green Market bag at this link http://suzies-yarnie-stuff.blogspot.com/2008/05/june-go-green-market-bag.html It doesn't have a seam or a turn or a beginning chain (well, a very short chain, if you don't use the magic loop). I have made literally dozens (we gave away fruit in them for holiday gifts) and everyone loves them. Good luck.
  11. I JUST encountered a sock pattern that used a Fptr and wow did it make the cable pop -- I will definitely remember that trick. Thanks, Jean.
  12. Okay, I have to ask for the pattern, too! Especially since it comes from Australia, a land I really want to visit (but can't get past all those hours on the plane!). Thanks in advance, Aggie May. peace, meg
  13. Lily Chin's new book has several methods for avoiding this problem. One that has worked for me is slip stitch into the last step of the stitch, rather than in the top of the finished stitch. In other words, when you have two loops left on the hook, rather than pulling up the working yarn, pull the loop through the top of the first stitch/chain in the round, then through the last two loops (all in one motion).
  14. I own more than 10 learn to crochet type books, and the one I return to again and again is Maggie Righetti's "Crocheting in Plain English." I have the original book, but there's a new version just out in 2009. She teaches you how to read patterns in the most effective way I've ever seen.
  15. I've been reading this thread since it was first posted, and now I have to throw my 2 cents in. Where I live (near Los Angeles airport) ALL LYS are like this. I have driven over 30 miles to all areas of L.A. and Orange county and have yet to find a LYS where the owner and her groupies DIDN'T behave this way. If anyone knows of a LYS in southern California that actually welcomes strangers, let alone crocheters, please let me know. I would LOVE to be disabused of my prejudices, but I'm still waiting to find this mythical store.
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