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winterlights08

Villager
  • Content Count

    103
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About winterlights08

  • Rank
    Villager
  • Birthday 08/31/1977

A Few Things About Me

  • Real name
    Erica
  • Short bio
    SAHM to four daughters
  • Location
    South Jersey
  • Hobbies
    What else?
  • Occupation
    Stay-at-home Mom
  • Favorite hook type
    Wood
  • Favorite projects
    Blankets and Afghans
  • Crocheting since...
    March 2008
  1. That turned out beautiful I'm the one over on Raverly who liked your colors so much I borrowed them for myself . I have a few other projects going on so I only have about 20 hexes done, and I'll probably pick it up again in the fall. I do love the colors you picked. I'm color-dumb so when I saw yours, I was like "that's it!". You really did a great job, it looks so 'neat', and I love the half-hexes and the border. That is an awesome gift, WTG!!!
  2. I should know this, but I usually buy yarn at one of the chain stores and just buy more yarn when I need it, and I've never really paid attention to yardage. I'm thinking of making a wool afghan for DH for his birthday, and I'd like to use Knitpicks Wool of the Andes. The colors are beautiful and the price is awesome. Anyway, I've selected eight colors, does anyone have any idea how many 50g/110 yard balls of each I should order? I was thinking 4-5 of each. So that would be 32-40 balls total. Too much? Not enough? I could always order more, but my next order might not be enough for the free shipping. I plan on making the Granny Stripe blanket (ala Attic 24), I'm not sure if that uses less yarn than a ripple? I just want it a large afghan size, not bed size. 40 balls just seems like a heck of a lot of yarn! Also, is the superwash softer than the regular wool? I've read reviews that the Wool of the Andes isn't very soft, so I'm wondering if it's worth it just to spend a bit more and get the superwash. The yardage is the same.
  3. Thank you everyone, that did help! In some lighting I really like the green, others not so much. It'll be done soon and thank goodness--like everything else I make it ends up a bit larger than intended. And of course my not being "in love" with it, well...it's just going on and on and on. My daughter sampled it out on the floor last night for pretend sleep. She seemed to like it .
  4. http://www.biscuitsandjam.com/stripe_maker.php
  5. I agree since it's close to Christmas you could could holiday related items. You could make a load of snowflakes from a ball of thread, and starch them so they're stiff. They make very pretty gift toppers!
  6. Great find! I grew up with a brown/yellow/orange afghan (70's child LOL), and know I know from pictures that it was a ripple. I think once I get through my WIP I'd like to try to recreate it...for sentimental reasons since I have no idea whatever happened to the original. I guess it got packed away or thrown away because of the outdated colors. I've since made my parents new afghans to replace that one .
  7. The buttons are cute, but I'd leave them off. A good rule of thumb is if you can put an object inside of a toilet paper tube, then it's too small for a baby/toddler. You'd be surprised what they can stick in their mouth. I could see a blanket with buttons being used for a newborn under his parent's watchful eye, or for pictures, but not when he gets older for sleeping. You never know what blanket will turn into his lovey and get dragged around for the next three years, buttons can loosen, crack, and break. Or maybe he'll figure out to pluck it off one day after his nap. Kids will always surprise you. My 2 1/2 year old still puts things in her mouth sometimes--she stops herself though, I think she thinks it's food! Pretty blanket though! I think the ribbon adds a nice enough accent.
  8. Beautiful afghan and adorable doggie!
  9. Right, just saying that usually that turning chain will count as your first stitch .
  10. http://attic24.typepad.com/weblog/crochet-bag.html Warning: you're gonna get hooked!
  11. Try putting a stitch marker (or a bobby pin or scrap of yarn) into the top of your turning chain so you know when you get back to it where to put that last stitch. If you're doing double crochets, you need to chain 3 (or 2 as some like to do) rather than a chain one to bring your next row up the height of the dc that you'll be doing. And usually (the pattern should specify) that turning chain will actually count as a stitch, so your next dc that you work in the next space would actually count as your second stitch. I hope that makes sense, and please if anyone wants to correct me, please do .
  12. She's from England so she usually uses UK terminology, but for this pattern she refers to the stitch as a dc and says she used US terminology. Confusing I know...
  13. I took a break from blankets and whipped this up yesterday. I finished the straps today and I still might add flowers. I may or may not line it, I've never done much sewing. Lucy's pattern was so easy and quick, and the cotton is so nice and soft. I used Sugar n' Cream (great stashbuster!) and this was the largest project I've made with it--now I'm thinking this would make a nice ripple . I might have to add that to my never ending list!
  14. I love it! I just finished mine and came on here to show it off .
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