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Sonny321

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About Sonny321

  • Rank
    Villager
  • Birthday 02/03/1970

A Few Things About Me

  • Location
    Texas
  • Occupation
    Wife and mom to 4 boys
  • Favorite hook type
    Handmade
  • Favorite projects
    Sweaters, household objects
  • Crocheting since...
    1990

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  1. That looks very similar to one I designed a couple years back. Same flower square, different neck shaping and edgings, but same basic idea. It's a lovely top.
  2. I respectfully disagree. It is not a mess. I will work up. A top tonight following the pattern and double check it. I am sorry you had trouble, but I believe it is correctly written. I agree it requires paying close attention to the instruction, so it is not a beginner pattern. I will get back to you with the results of my test.
  3. Just wanted to say thanks So much for the lovely friendship squares. I LOVE purple and you totally made my day.
  4. There are several ways, you could simply subtract rows at the # sign in the pattern rather than adding them. You will have to pay attention to whether you need to be at the shoulder part or the bottom part when you are adding or subtracting rows. You can just eyeball it by holding it up to you frequently in front of the mirror as you are making it, which is what I did when I made it in a different weight yarn. Darski's suggestion is excellent as well.
  5. I found some yarn at the thrift store yesterday. The Label says Perle Krepp, it is made in Norway an it is 100% wool. The yarn I have is sport weight and very stretchy. I worked up a little of it today and just LOVE the feel and drape of it. I think it must be vintage yarn because I can't seem to find it anywhere on the internet. I would LOVE to have more of this yarn, If anyone has heard of this particular yarn or knows where I could get my hands on it, I'd be grateful. Thanks.
  6. Sorry, I wear a size 8 1/2. I'll add that to the pattern.
  7. Sonny’s Socks These were made to fit my feet specifically. You can adjust them up or down in size as you make them. I have fairly narrow feet so you may want to go up a hook size to an e-hook. This pattern assumes you have a basic understanding of both crochet and sock construction. 100 gram skein Sockotta sock yarn D hook Stitches used: Slip stitch Sc: Single crochet Hdc: Half double crochet Dc: Double crochet 1. Ch 2, work 8 sc in 2nd ch from hook, join with slip stitch to the 1st sc. 2. Ch 1, 2 sc in each sc around, join with slip stitch to the 1st sc. (16 sc) 3. Ch1, *2 sc in 1st sc, 1 sc in the next sc, Repeat from * around, Join with slip stitch to the 1st sc. (24 sc) 4. Ch1, *2 sc in the 1st sc, 1 sc in each of the next 2 sc, Repeat from * around, Join with slip stitch to the 1st sc. (32 sc) 5. Ch1, *2sc in the 1st sc, 1 sc in each of the next 3 sc, Repeat from * around, Join with slip stitch to the 1st sc. (40 sc) 6. Ch1, *2sc in the 1st sc, 1 sc in each of the next 4 sc, Repeat from * around, Join with slip stitch to the 1st sc. (48 sc) 7 -16. Ch1, sc in each stitch around, join with slip stitch to the 1st sc. (48 sc) 17. Ch1, work one sc and one dc in the 1st sc * skip next sc, 1 sc and 1 dc in the next sc, repeat from * around, Join with a slip stitch to the 1st sc. Ch 1, turn. 18. Sc in the same sc that you joined the last round on, ch1, skip the dc and *sc in the next stitch, ch 1 skip the dc, Repeat from * around, join with a slip stitch to the 1st sc. Ch1, turn 19. Work 1 sc and 1 dc in the 1st Ch 1 space, * work 1 sc and 1 dc in the next ch1 space, repeat from * around, join with a slip stitch to the 1st sc. Ch 1, turn. 20 – 31. Repeat rows 18-19 (do not turn at the end of round 31) (You can add or subtract in increments of two rows in order to accommodate longer or shorter feet) 32. 2 sc in the 1st sc, 1 sc in each of the next 5 stitches, *2 sc in the next stitch, 1 sc in each of the next 5 stitches, repeat around, join with a slip stitch to the 1st stitch. (56 stitches) Heel Opening Row: loosely slip stitch over 28 stitches (remember to count the joining slip stitch) then loosely chain 28 and without twisting the chain, skip the remaining 28 stitches and join it to the 1st slip stitch. 33. Repeat row 17 34 – 39. Repeat rows 18 and 19 40. Repeat row 18 Edging row: 41. In 1st Ch 1 space work (1 sc, 1 hdc and 1 dc), slip stitch in the next ch1 space, *In the next Ch 1 space work (1 sc, 1 hdc and 1 dc), slip stitch in the next ch1 space, repeat from * around join with slip stitch to 1st sc and fasten off. Afterthought Heel (do not turn in this section) Attach yarn to the center of the bottom part of the heel opening. Round 1: Work one row of sc evenly around, join with slip stitch ch1. Round 2: Work sc around making two sc decreases at each corner (4 decreases total) Join with slip stitch and ch 1. Round 3: repeat round 1. Rounds 4-12: Repeat round 2. Fasten off, leaving a tail long enough to sew (or slip stitch) the small opening, closed. Weave in ends.
  8. I picked up a couple skeins of sock yarn, a pattern booklet and some double pointed needles, intending to teach myself how to knit socks. And while I haven't given up entirely, I did decide I needed some instant gratification. So I opted to crochet one of the skeins, and save the other for my knitted sock attempt/disaster. I LOVE how these turned out. No pattern, it's just your basic toe up style sock with a few minor customizations. I opt to start my toes with a circle, ch 2 and work 8 sc into the 2nd ch from hook. And then increase like you normally do when making a circle. I joined the rounds ( mainly because the stitch patten in the main body of the sock is worked in such a way that you have to turn with each row. ) Once I got the toe part the right size I started a simple 2 row pattern repeat. The stitch pattern makes the joinings virtually invisable which I like. You can find the pattern here: http://www.crochetville.org/forum/showthread.php?p=1139935#post1139935
  9. I use an after thought heel. I've never attempted the short row heel, I know there are some tutorials out there for them but just haven't gotten around to learning it. I like the short ankle socks too. I just can't get the leg part to fit properly when I make them go up higher, it's too loose and floppy anound my bony ankles. That might be my weird feet though I have a deep arch so I have to make that part pretty big to go over my heel.
  10. I really didn't use a pattern exactly. I've just made enough of them that I understand the basic sock construction. Any toe up sock tutorial will work though, like the one below. http://www.graftonfibers.com/socks.htm The only thing I do different is how I start mine. I chain 2 and then work 6 sc in the 2nd chain from hook for the first round, 2 scs in each sc in the 2nd round, 2 sc in the first sc 1 in the next* repeat around for the 3rd and so on, until the circle is big enough( usually 5 or 6 rounds for thicker yarns.) and then just continue like the tutorial says. You may need to add some increases to accomadate the circumference of your arch and to get it to fit over your heel. Socks are simple once you've made a pair and understand the basic construction your options are limitless.
  11. I probably have more socks and slippers than any other woman on the planet. I seriously love them though since I suffer from the world's iciest toes, even in a mild Texas winter. Plus they are such a simple project to make and don't take much yarn or time. I do love instant gratification. I started these last night while watching tv. They are simply your standard toe up/type sock, made from regular old red heart worsted weight and an I hook. I start my sock/sock style slippers with a circle rather that an oval, simply because it's easier for me, and I am a touch lazy . To add some warmth without the added bulk, I crocheted over and carried the yarn for the stripes that I wasn't using at the time around each row, Like you do in tapestry crochet I believe. You just have to be careful not to tug the yarn you are carrying to tight or you can make then too snug. It makes for Way fewer ends to weave in, as I said before I'm lazy lol. Any way these fit nice and snug. I have them on right now, along with my double thick textured slippers, and I think, just maybe, my poor toes are starting to thaw.
  12. I agree that cotton is the preferred material to work with when making potholders and dishcloths. However, I use up my small acrylic scraps making potholders and dishcloths for myself and my Mother in law. I've done it for years and years and years. I've only had one potholder melt and that was a tiny spot from where I dropped it directly on the red hot burner. In my experiance, acrylic holds up very well to heavy kitchen use. It's durable, holds it's color through countless washes, including being tossed in white the whites and bleach. While it's Not as absorbant when used to wipe up a counter, it's completely functional to wash the goop off a plate. And ANY material will burn if you aren't careful.
  13. Pattern is now available in the Original patterns section of the board. http://www.crochetville.org/forum/showthread.php?t=69825
  14. Sonny’s x-tra thick unisex textured unisex slippers Abbreviations:Ch. - ChainSt. – StitchSl. St. – Slip StitchSc. – Single Crochet fpdc- front post double crochet {There is a tutorial on how to make the fpdc here: http://www.crochetcabana.com/stitches/stitches-fpdc-bpdc.htm } Here is a Youtube video I made explaining how the FPDC is done: Materials needed2 skeins Red heart super saver yarn ( hold 2 strands together throughout)H hook to make average woman’s size slipper, I hook to make men’sStitch marker (use in rounds 1 – 5 to mark the starting stitch of each round) I made this to fit a woman’s size 8 foot; I have marked in red the places where you can adjust this to fit your individual foot size. Ch 2 1. In 2nd Ch from hook work 6 sc (place stitch marker to mark the first stitch of each of the next 5 rows) do not join (6 sc) 2. 2 sc in each stitch around (do not join) (12 sc) 3. 2sc in first stitch, 1 in the next repeat pattern around (do not join) (18 sc) 4. 2sc in first stitch, 1 sc in each of the next 2 stitches, repeat around (do not join) (24 sc) 5. 2sc in first stitch, 1 sc in each of the next 3 stitches, repeat around (do not join) (30 sc) 6. 1 sc in each+ stitch around join with slip stitch to the first sc of the row. Ch 1 7. Ch 1 Sc in 1st stitch, *work 1 fpdc around the next stitch in the row UNDER the current row, skip the stitch directly behind the Fpdc you just made, sc in the next stitch, Repeat from * around ending with a fpdc. Join with Sl. St. Ch1 (in all following FPDC rounds work the FPDC around the FPDC in the row below) 8 – 19: repeat rounds 6 and 7 (6 times) end round 13 by joining with a Sl. St. and then Sl. St. in the next 4 stitches. Ch 1, turn. (Try the slipper on at this point to determine if you need to add more repeats, You’ll want it to hit around the arch of your foot at this point) 20. Sc in each of the next 21 stitches, Ch 1 and turn, leaving the remaining stitches unworked. 21. Sc in the 1st stitch, * fpdc around the next stitch in the row UNDER the current row, skip the stitch directly behind the Fpdc you just made, sc in the next stitch, Repeat from * around ending with a sc. Ch1 and turn 22. - 33. Repeat rows 20 and 21 (6 times) {Increase or decrease the number of repeats as needed to insure a snug fit on the heel} ch 1 and turn 34. Work sc in each of the next 9 stitches; work a sc decrease over the next 2 stitches. Ch 1 and turn. Back seam Back seam:With Right sides together, slip stitch together the unworked stitches to the Sc’s you just made on Row 34, Ch 1. Edging Rows Edging rows: (To adjust the fit across the top of the foot work a SC decrease in each to the “corners “ on the top part of the foot) Work 1 row of Sc evenly around the foot opening, decreasing in the corners, join round with a slip stitch. Ch 1 Work one row of sc evenly around the foot opening, without decreasing in the corners, join with a slip stitch. Ch 1 3-4. Repeat rows 1 and 2. Fasten off and weave in ends. You can make a long chain( 75 chains will work just fine) to weave into the sc edging rows to make a bow tie, a long piece of pretty ribbon would work as well.
  15. I plan to post it to the Original patterns, I'm just waiting to get the results from the testers. It might be a week or two because some of my testers are finishing up some Christmas projects.
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