Real Deal

Villager
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About Real Deal

  • Rank
    Villager
  • Birthday 02/26/1951

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  • Biography
    Live in a small town. Have degrees in Philosophy & Women's Studies. Love to read, a lot.
  • Location
    Small town in central New York State.
  • Interests
    Other things to do with my gemstones, crocheting, sewing, cooking, reading, cats (I have 4)
  • Occupation
    Design and make gemstone jewelry.
  • How long have you been crocheting?
    My best guess is that I started crocheting between 1975 and 1980.
  • Favorite things to crochet
    Generally items with worsted weight or sport weight yarn. I'm currently expanding into baby yarn. Don't do thread items.
  • Favorite Hook
    Wood
  1. Most of the year it's cold here too, in the Finger Lakes area of New York State. That's when it isn't July and August. I'm a kitty lover too. Is there such a thing as crochet without cat hair in it? Hmmm. You'll love Crochetville!
  2. That's what I like - useful and good looking! 3 times now, I have made huge market bags I meant to put in my car for bringing groceries in to the house. Uh huh. They've almost made it to the car, but somehow never have. They just somehow ended up filled with yarn so perfectly that I had to keep them in here as yarn bags.
  3. Oh, that came out beautiful! I'll bet she was stunned to see you did all that work for her!
  4. Awe, aren't they sweet!
  5. If my memory is right, Bernat Satin is worsted weight. You can make tons of things with worsted weight. Bernat Satin can't usually be mixed with other ww's because it has a different finish, but you could mix it with other Satin colors if you really like it. Being in New York State, we always think of warm items first - blankets, afghans, shawls, legwarmers. hats, scarves, mittens. I also like to do placemats and table mats. Then there's bags, everything from little drawstring ones, cosmetic bags, small crossbody bags, purses, and totes.
  6. Good photographs ARE important. I can't count how many times I've seen striped or variegated items photographed on a floral or very busy background. It's hard to see the crochet properly and a busy background makes it difficult to enjoy. I've noticed that often a color or 2 in the crocheted item are also in the busy background, so I'm assuming the person taking the picture likes that look. I can almost hear it - "Oh, look, the scarf I just made, goes with my bedspread!"
  7. No, I didn't see your other comment. 75". Hmm. 6'3". Well that's certainly long and wide enough for anyone. I'm 5'10" and I'd probably have to leave some rounds off or I'd be walking all over it! It's probably designed this way so each vest can be custom made to fit the wearer by stopping at a comfortable point.
  8. I agree with Becky. I'd add to the center back piece on each side only. The vest looks plenty long enough for anyone, even a quite tall woman. Also the armholes are very large, so they shouldn't be a problem. If, when you finish, the woman wants it to wrap around her more, add to the outside side edges only until she is happy with the width. I am thinking oval shape also.
  9. I guess Pandy thinks she is the queen kitty! And cats love those small balls. I can't tell you how many my cats hide beneath the furniture and refrigerator, then they want more to replace the ones they can no longer reach. They must think we have an unending supply!
  10. What a cutie!
  11. Oh, how pretty! I'll bet she loves it!
  12. Oh, I love these! When I was a child, I adored wearing playsuits. They were shorts with a halter top, and made of fabric, but I don't think there were patterns for crocheted ones at that time. I would have loved skirt ones also. One day my mother told me there'd be no more playsuits because they didn't go any higher in size, and I was absolutely striken. I begged her to find me some somewhere! She insisted I was too old for playsuits and needed to get used to the idea. I think this traumatized me for life. My mother knit and crocheted then, so had she thought of it, she could have made me halter tops with skirts, and I would have been soooo happy. Maybe I should make myself some now. How strange would that look on a woman in her 60's?
  13. Many years ago, I read about how the crackling joints has to do with the senovial fluid between each joint. I don't know if that's spelled correctly. Apparently we have a tiny cushion of fluid between each bone, between the joints, that helps the joints move smoothly. Probably with use and age, causing distortions and arthritis, the fluid gets squashed and moved out of place. With me, once in a while, I have a finger joint get stuck while I crochet. It doesn't hurt, but it feels very peculiar. I have to grip that joint with the fingers of my other hand and move it around to loosen it up. It will be fine after that. My left shoulder and neck are much more likely to act up, in a very painful way too. I have a bad disk in my neck, which is not good to have with the position in which we sit to crochet, and look at our work. I now always support my arms, and my favorite chair is a rocking chair. Your arms are actually very heavy and can cause a lot of pain in the shoulder, neck or upper back if unsupported. All of you younger women may as well take up the habit of supporting your arms if you want to crochet into your older years without a lot of pain. Best of all, if you crochet all afternoon or evening, take a lot of breaks. Get up, move around, stretch, go do something. It really does make a difference. I know what it's like when your crochet is going along beautifully, and the only time you stop for a minute and look up is to check the pattern or take a sip of coffee. When you look at the clock, 2 hours have gone by, but you'd swear it's only been 45 minutes! Now you go to get up and oh man, does something hurt. A lot. Your hip, or ribs, or shoulder. How did that happen? Yup, you need to take breaks more frequently. Should have listened!
  14. New people often don't know how much to chain up when beginning each row. In general, ch up 1 for a sc row, 2 for a hdc row and 3 for a dc row. For a dc row, if the ch 3 is looking loose or sloppy, tighten up the 3, or only do 2 in the future.